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Else 10.27.14 – Assange Takes on Google

By - October 26, 2014

23200_large_google-dr-evil(image) So what are the most powerful, important, noteworthy stories of the past ten or so days? Read on to find out….

Assange: Google Is Not What It Seems – Newsweek

Julian Assange veers between wild eyed conspiracy theory and, well, level-headed conspiracy theory in this rather factless but quite compelling read.

The Surveillance State and You - Vice

Behind the scenes when Snowden spilled the beans.

The Digital Media Layer Cake — Backchannel — Medium

A breakdown of how value is working in today’s media world. Worthy.

The End Of Apps As We Know Them – Inside Intercom

This company is on top of the most important story on the future of mobile.

Peak Google – Stratechery

Great piece, but flawed. I rebutted it: “Peak Google”? Maybe, But Is “Native” The Reason?

The age of loneliness is killing us – The Guardian

I understand the argument but am unsure if this is really an issue, or rather, something we always struggle with.

Nerd culture is destroying Silicon Valley – Quartz

An ongoing meme these days, however – if nerds are destroying it…who built it?

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Else 10.13.14: Smiling Happy Facebook People (Not Teens, Though)

By - October 12, 2014
Facebook Atlas

Now you can buy real, smiling, happy shiny people all over the web, courtesy Facebook.

Today’s summary covers the past two weeks of worthy reads, with a strong dose of the Internet’s twin titans Facebook and Google. I’ve also been busy writing on Searchblog, so you’ll find three of my own pieces highlighted below.

Facebook’s new Atlas is a real threat to Google display dominance — Gigaom

The first such challenge in … forever.

Facebook is unleashing its ads—and surveillance—onto the internet at large – Quartz

And while it took a long time, it’s now real. So what does it mean for publishers? Read on…

A tip for media companies: Facebook isn’t your enemy, but it’s not your friend either — Gigaom

The industry seems to be slowly waking up to the fact that Facebook is more complicated than perhaps we gave it credit for. Sure, BuzzFeed has been winning by leveraging viral content, but now that Facebook is leveraging its data across the web, including the data it picks up from publisher’s sites, those same publishers are starting to do the math and realize that perhaps they aren’t winning after all.

Teens are officially over Facebook – The Washington Post

Until they’re not.

Programmatic Ad Buying to Reach $21 Billion – CMO Today – WSJ

That’s a very large piece of a growing pie – and it’s set to only increase as programmatic underpins nearly all digital advertising, period.

Some pros and cons of Google’s plan to give every “thing” a URL — Gigaom

The phsyical and digital come one step to connection in this Google-led open source schema. Browse the web, browse the world…

End-user computing — The Truant Haruspex — Medium

I love pieces like this. From it: “We increasingly live in a computer-embroidered reality, and the ability to manipulate that reality is empowering. If we can find a way to bring that ability to a wide audience, it could have an impact comparable to the invention of the printing press.”

A Secret of Uber’s Success: Struggling Workers – Bloomberg View

“On-demand has thrived, in part, because the nation has dropped a bedraggled and optionless workforce in its lap — and on-demand’s success depends in part on the idea that our nation won’t change.”

Venture capital and the great big Silicon Valley asshole game | PandoDaily

Any piece that starts with “Silicon Valley has an asshole problem, and it’s high time we owned up to it” is going to get attention, and Sarah Lacy’s piece did exactly that. Lacy deconstructs the forces driving behaviors in the Valley these days, and finds our industry wanting.

Killer Apps in the Gigabit Age | Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project

What might a true gigabit Internet bring? Pew asked the experts.

A Master Class In Google — Backchannel — Medium

Steven Levy is right – to understand the world today, it sure helps to understand Google. Not sure that’s possible, but one can try.

Marc Andreessen on Finance: ‘We Can Reinvent the Entire Thing’ – Bloomberg

This interview lit up the Interwebs big time last week.

You are not your browser history. — Medium

Artist Jer Thorp launches a project to visualize what can be known from browser history.

New Statesman | The most influential tech company you’ve never heard of

Spoiler: It’s Alcatel-Lucent.

The NSA and Me – First Look

Veteran NSA watcher James Bamford tells his story.

The Next Stage of Mobile Quickening: Links Get Intelligent- Searchblog

In which I argue that what Branch Metrics is doing is a good next step toward a true mobile web.

My Picks for NewCo Silicon Valley – Searchblog

NewCo SV is next week!

Living Systems and The Information First Compan- Searchblog

Companies that put information flows at the center of their businesses are winning.

Else 9.29.14: Google snorts milk through its nose; Food, Things, and Marketing

By - September 28, 2014

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(image) This past week’s links are rife with people asking hard questions of Google and Facebook, and so much the better, I’d warrant. You don’t get to the lead position without raising questions. In fact, that seems to be the theme of the week – asking interesting questions – of our online services, our marketing, and our food (yes, our food). To the links:

How Facebook and Google are taking over your online identity – Quartz

Look, it’s not like we don’t realize that these two companies are tracking everything we do. We are inured, we are banner blind, we are…well, we are about to realize we have a lot more power than we thought. But this piece doesn’t make that point, unfortunately.

Websites Are Wary of Facebook Tracking Software – WSJ

Wary, but not stopping themselves from using it.

Google’s Schmidt: Tim Cook, what are you talking about? - CNBC

Put another way: Apple, you are so damn precious, so damn arrogant, STFU.

Google Responds to News Corp’s EU Antitrust Case Criticisms – TNW

Another way of looking at this might be “Google snorts milk through its nose when asked about the EU.”

Facebook Demetricator – benjamin grosser

Ah, I love a good hack. Alas, not many others do. Ever wish you could use a service like Facebook without the constant numeration? Check this out, a worthy addition to the debate. And code to boot.

The tyranny of digital advertising  (Medium)

A relatively new participant in digital advertising takes stock, and has more questions than answers. But I liked his perspective and his questions.

Every Company Is An Experience Company – Searchblog

A dude who’s been in the media business longer than not (really, I’ve been in this game more years than not, which is rather stoney) has a few ideas about where “content marketing” and “native advertising” has to go next.

Copy-Remix-Profit: How YouTube & Shapeways Are Inventing the Future of Copyright – Hunter Walk

First, make it possible for everyone to ignore dumb laws. Next, profit from it. No wonder Google is the largest investor in Uber.

Inside Solid: who will build the god platform for the Internet of Things? - O’Reilly Radar

Well, there you have it. The race is on to create the next platform we never thought we would use (but will).

Forget GMOs. The Future of Food Is Data—Mountains of It – WIRED

I had a chance to go to Hampton Creek last week. Super inspiring. I hope to write it up soon (but I’m in New York for NewCo NewYork and Advertising Week. GAH.)

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Else 9.22.14: Good Design Trumps Good Code

By - September 21, 2014

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This week’s Else is brought to you by good design, which trumps good code any day. And by the Alibaba IPO, which kind of pissed me off (see below). Enjoy the links!

The UX App That’s Driving Design Everywhere, From Airbnb to Zappos – WIRED

When I read this I thought – “Of course there’s an app for that.” And then I thought – “I gotta use this app!”

Pranking My Roommate With Eerily Targeted Facebook Ads  – My Social Sherpa

This is just so good, so rich, so fun. If you work in media or marketing, a must read.

Why Is Our Sci-Fi So Glum About A.I.? - NYTimes.com

Yes, my point exactly when I wrote my review of Her, which does not hew to the Hollywood narrative of AI Will Kill Us All.

Apple will no longer unlock most iPhones, iPads for police, even with search warrants – The Washington Post

Bravo, Apple, a huge play to push the data control off platform and into the hands of everyone. BRAVO.

Tim Cook Interview: The iPhone 6, the Apple Watch, and Being Nice – Businessweek

If you want to understand the new guy running Apple, this is the place to start.

Amazon Tops List of Google’s 25 Biggest Search Advertisers – Advertising Age

I wonder why? Hmmmmmmmmmm.

The $3.2 Billion Man: Can Google’s Newest Star Outsmart Apple? | Co.Design

I don’t think Tony Fadell thinks his job is to “outsmart Apple” but then again, it makes for a good headline. And the profile is good too.

Yahoo Stock Crashes As Alibaba IPOs – Business Insider

Ah yes – Alibaba. It’s not that Yahoo! exactly crashed (down 5%), but that it’s really worth very little were it not for the Alibaba holdings. That simply doesn’t make any sense.

Thoughts On Alibaba (Searchblog)

In which I think out loud about Alibaba. I am pretty sure I will piss a few folks off with this one. Sorry.

Venture Capitalist Sounds Alarm on Silicon Valley Risk – WSJ

Bill Gurley may well also have pissed some folks off, but in the end, I think he’s right in the thesis that too many companies are burning too much cash.

 

 

Else 9.15.14: Ma, Thiel, Apple Pay, and Minecraft

By - September 15, 2014

Apple-Pay-main1I’m easing back into this weekly Else column, or put another way, I missed last week’s Else due to preparations for NewCo SF, which I’m proud to say was a huge success. This week is Detroit, then New York, London, Boulder, LA, Palo Alto, but I get ahead of myself. For today, I’ll just focus on the best stories of the past 14 or so days. Much has happened in that time period, including Microsoft buying Minecraft, Alibaba filing for an IPO in the US, and yet another Apple announcement. I like the watch best, but in the shorter term, I think Apple Pay is the first mover. Bigger iPhones? Been there.

Why Apple Pay could succeed where others have had underwhelming results (ars) It all comes down to timing and getting the back end players to play nice. Apple most likely will have a hit on its hands – once they update the OS with the service.

A Cambrian Explosion In AI Is Coming (TC) THe author, former CEO of what is now Apple’s Siri service, predicts a new marketplace beyond search and the App store. Sounds like  a place I’m interested in, given this: Early Lessons From My Mobile Deep Dive: The Quickening Is Nigh.

We’re Innumerate, Which Is Why We Love Visualizations (Searchblog) A short piece thinking out loud about innumeracy.

After Selling Out to Microsoft, Minecraft and Its Founder Write the World’s Best Press Releases (re/code) Minecraft is a phenomenon. I hope Microsoft doesn’t screw it up, but I have my doubts.

Should We All Take a Bit of Lithium? (NYT) The article does not answer the question. Which is a shame. I have a long history with the drug, not personally, but through a close relative. Too much is too much, not enough, a problem. I’m curious to learn more.

Programmatic bidding: Buy, buy, baby  (The Economist) A short intro to the practice, a longer overview of the online advertising model, with attendant concerns over privacy and surveillance, is in the print version (and behind paywall online).

Utilities of the Future (Forbes) In which a rather contra-Forbesian case is made for turning nearly the entire current sharing economy into some kind of utility.

One man willingly gave Google his data. See what happened next. (ORR) Not what you might expect. In fact, this doubter was turned into a believer that Google’s not as bad as we might fear.

The surveillance society is a step forward. But one that harkens back to our deep forager past. (Praxtime) An expansive essay about the public/private debate. Really worth the read.

Who is Jack Ma, the man behind the largest ever tech IPO? (Telegraph) Good question. Turns out, as you might expect, he’s something of a character.

Peter Thiel disagrees with you (Fortune) As long as we’re going with profiles of larger than life characters, this one is very worthy as well.

Else 9.2.14: Don’t Worry, The Robots Are Our Friends. But the People?

By - September 01, 2014
Blade-Runner_610

“All these moments…will be lost in time…”

Else is back after an extended summer hiatus – thanks for taking the time off with me. I wasn’t sure if I was going to return to this newsletter, but its a good ritual for me to condense and annotate my daily and weekly reading habits, and enough of you have subscribed that I figured you might be missing the updates. I kind of was.

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The pieces I most enjoyed over the past week or so certainly had a theme: How will we resolve our increasingly uneasy relationship to the technology we have embraced? From automated newsfeeds to drones to AI, this stuff isn’t science fiction anymore, and the consequences are getting very real. To the links….

“Facebook Is a Weatherless World” (Searchblog)

In which I think about automated newsfeeds and a world without agency.

Inside Google’s Secret Drone-Delivery Program (The Atlantic)

Well, not exactly  secret anymore, as Google certainly wanted this particular story to get out, as it’s in a mad scramble for the future of “everything delivery” with Amazon and others. Still and all a fascinating look into one of Google’s many strange and disparate moonshots.

Robots With Their Heads in the Clouds (Medium)

Berkeley prof. Ken Goldberg lays out the quickening sparked by the combination of cloud compute and intelligent on the ground (or in the air) robots.

Wednesday Aug. 20, 2064 — What’s Next (Medium)

One of my favorite writers (Paul Ford) imagines what it might be like if all these drones and robots actually work in an optimistic scenario feature driverless cars, compostable made to order clothing, and, of course, budding romance.

Will artificial intelligence destroy humanity? Here are 5 reasons not to worry. (Vox)

It’s not easy to be human, so relax. The AI-driven roboto-verse will serve us, in the main.

ICREACH: How the NSA Built Its Own Secret Google (The Intercept)

Then again, we might want to worry about our own power structures. Imagine how the NSA might use the fantasy infrastructure that Ford creates in Medium. Yikes.

Why Uber must be stopped (Salon)

A few things about this piece. First, the headline is wrong. It’s not about stopping Uber, it’s about understanding the role of regulation when capitalism otherwise goes unchecked. Second, it appropriately wonders what happens when capital (Uber’s $1.5billion from Google, Goldman, et al) is used to crush competition, in particular, when the company that is doing the crushing has, as its end game, control of our automated transportation system (there are those dern robots again). A theme for our coming age. It’s not the cars, the drones, the tech – it’s the people behind their use. But sometimes, the way a society regulates people is to regulate the tech they employ.

SHOULD TWITTER, FACEBOOK AND GOOGLE EXECUTIVES BE THE ARBITERS OF WHAT WE SEE AND READ? (The Intercept)

Should journalists use all caps in headlines?! Apparently yes. This story is consistent with the others in this issue of Else, the debate is in full throat. See also The Atlantic’s The New Editors of the Internet.

The Facebook-ification of everything! Sex, authenticity and reality for the status update era (Salon)

Continuing my headline clickbait complaint, this headline is a total misfit for the unfortunately dry story, written by noted informational academic Lucian Floridi. He’s got a new book out, the 4th Revolution, which I plan to read. Then again, I have five books ahead of his…

Supercomputers make discoveries that scientists can’t (New Scientist)

See, we’ve found a great use for computers: Reading the stuff too dry to read ourselves.

Seeing Through the Illusion: Understanding Apple’s Mastery of the Media (9-5Mac)

My first job as a reporter was in 1987 covering Apple. For more than a decade after, I continued covering the company, through Jobs’ return. It never wavered in its philosophy around how it treated the press – as a nuisance and a threat. I’ve always thought Apple could have done better. This multi-part post fails to go as deep as I’d like, but it’s a decent overview of how Apple’s PR machine works.

Minecraft players build working hard drives (Cnet)

Minecraft has been on my “watch this closely” list for about a year. Here’s another reason why.

The Matter With Time (NY)

If you like your inside baseball with a side of dish, here’s a great read about the travails of Time Inc., the once great publishing house.

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Else 7.7.14: You’re Not A Target Till You Are

By - July 07, 2014

NSAThe past week brought fresh revelations about how the NSA targets US citizens, and new insights on the founders of Google, the history of technology, and ongoing stories from Facebook and the EU. To the links….

In NSA-intercepted data, those not targeted far outnumber the foreigners who are – The Washington Post - This is a long-ish read, but please, if you read only one story, read this one. The details are important, and most likely will be the basis of alot of debate yet to come about Snowden’s impact.

Betting on the Ponies: non-Unicorn Investing – Reaction Wheel – Investor Jerry Neumann writes a fine overview of his philosophy on investing, and why it makes no sense whatsoever to chase the best in field.

Fireside chat with Google co-founders, Larry Page and Sergey Brin – Khosla Ventures Kudos to Khosla for giving all of us a look behind the walls of its annual CEO conference, and inside the minds of Google’s founders.

When the Terminators come, only Google’s co-founders will be safe – Verge – And here’s what they are really thinking about – A funny little Easter Egg shows that the top brass at Google are worried about the same things we are…sort of.

Historian of Technology Cruelly Crushes Internet Myths – Scientific American  Q&A with a technology historian is a good read, reviews many of the myths and stories behind the creation of networks and platforms we now take for granted.

The EU’s Right To Be Forgotten Is A Mess & How Google’s Making It Worse – SEL - I didn’t think this was going to work out well…

Screwing with your emotions is Facebook’s entire business – Vox – We are reminded that the entire business of advertising is an attempt to “screw with our emotions.” Then again, so is the entire business of humanity, on some level.

A Return To Form In Media – Searchblog My musings on what Print can teach us in a world of digital.

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Else 6.30.14: Input, Output, Kaput

By - June 30, 2014

EndofInternet

This past week in tech brought Google’s I/O developer conference, and with it lots of debate on the culture of the Valley, the future of links in the mobile world, the end of the Internet (again), and the death of the IPO. To the (dead? resurgent?) links:

In­side the Mir­rortoc­ra­cy – Carlos Buenos  From time to time a commentator hits the mark when it comes to the Valley’s culture. This piece resonated for many last week – and sparked a renewed debate about whether the Valley is too insular.

The next thing Silicon Valley needs to disrupt big time: its own culture – Quartz A complement to the piece above. After all, we’ve had enough of disruption, no? No! Time to disrupt our culture of disruption, naturally!

The End of the Internet? – The Atlantic Every week, the Internet is over, apparently. This piece tracks the regionalization of the Internet, thanks in no small part to the NSA’s broad reach and geopolitical impact.

Disrupting Innovative Game Changing Disruptors – NewCo In which I give an overview of the Christensen fracas, and some thoughts on why it matters.

Facebook Doesn’t Understand The Fuss About Its Emotion Manipulation Study – Forbes Last week Facebook was caught a bit flat-footed when a study that manipulated some of its users’ emotions was uncovered. It’s hard Facebook, to be sure, but this study should have been flagged early for its PR implications.

Google’s master plan: Turn everything into data- Slate Yup. That’s pretty much at the core of it. However, this would be happening whether or not it was “Google’s master plan.”

The IPO is dying. Marc Andreessen explains why. – Vox I saw Marc speak last week at a conference, and he made these points quite compellingly.

Google’s Grand Plans: A Conversation With Larry Page and Sundar Pichai – NYTimes Last week’s I/O gave the world a chance to consider Google with some perspective. This is one of the better interviews that came out of the press deluge. See also this piece from the Times on Page’s plans and this on the main news from I/O.

Understanding Apple’s Wearable Strategy | Tech.pinions Yes, and it’s not just Apple where identity is the key axis point of wearable, it’s the next most important signal after location. First, where is this person? Second, WHO is this person? Third, WHAT is this person doing? And fourth…WHY?!

Search and Apps – Give Consumers Back Their Links – searchblog I’ve been on about this for some time, I sense a gathering movement that bears watching. More here.

Living in a Fool’s Paradise | Boom: A Journal of California A new journal has a good overview of the impact the tech boom is having on real estate in California.

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Else 6.23.14: Questioning Valley Idols

By - June 23, 2014

A fascinating week of links, starting with a blast from the past (see above), but the real meat of the week came in the debates around some of the Valley’s most scared cows. For more, read on….

Tech Time Warp of the Week: Watch IBM Warn Us About Glassholes 10 Years Ago- Wired I am particularly enamored with “Park Bench” – if I saw a guy doing what this guy is doing in public, I’d throw something at him. I recall seeing this way back when it first came out, and I hated him then. Now it’s insufferable.

Dear Marc Andreessen – Alex Payne Payne picks a fight that many wanted to see – questioning the philosophy of one of the Valley’s most sacred idols.

Jill Lepore: What the Theory of “Disruptive Innovation” Gets Wrong : The New Yorker Another takedown of a Valley idol, which prompted a response later in Businessweek.

Why We Need to Tame Our Algorithms Like Dogs- Wired A conceptual scoop of a story – algorithms are a new life form that we are co-evolving with. Neat cocktail party idea.

Is Coding the New Literacy? | Mother Jones Sort of, the magazine argues. In fact, learning to think like a coder is more important.

The Rise of the Personal Data Marketplace – OZY A survey of new startups that are trying to spark a marketplace I’ve been on about for years. We’re closer than we were five years ago. but we’re still without a quickening in the ecosystem. Here’s another, related story on Wickr.

Yahoo Wants You to Linger (on the Ads, Too) – NYTimes.com  A much needed deep dive into what Yahoo is actually trying to accomplish in its most important product – media. I left the piece unconvinced Yahoo! is going to win here, but…wanting it to.

Michael Bloomberg on cities and innovation – The European The Mayor on ho to get sh*t done at the local level. I love the dynamics of cities.

The Secret to Getting Top-Secret Secrets – Matter – Medium Great story on an obsessive journalist, and the crazy FOIA (Freedom of Information Act) bureaucracy.

The Problem With Obama’s Internet Policy – Foreign Affairs Foreign Affairs argues that the biggest disappointment of Obama’s tenure is its net neutrality stance.

At Google, Larry Page Finds His Right-Hand Man – The Information The Information believes Sundar Pichai is Page’s next in command. I imagine any number of folks inside Google might disagree, including the deferential Pichai. But he does have a crucial role with Android going forward.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Else 6.16.14: Internet Ads Grow, Apple Ads Blow

By - June 16, 2014
IAB 6.14

Up and to the right, baby.

Lots of advertising news in this issue of Signal, as the bi-annual IAB report shows strong gains (YAY, Internet!). To the links:

Internet Ads Surge 19% in Just One Year – WSJ That’s strong growth for an industry working on its 21st year. (IAB report)

The Three Phases Of Mobile Advertising – BubbaVC Sometimes the best posts are really simple.

For Apple, Marketing Is a Whole New Game – Advertising Age Apple once commanded unequalled respect from the ad world. Not any longer. Typically, the piece forgets that it all comes down to product….

Only Apple – Daring Fireball – Regardless of how the company markets itself, if you don’t read John Gruber on all things Apple, you’re not getting the full scoop. Of course, he’s in the tank, but he’s smart nevertheless on the heels on WWDC, a must read.

We need to regulate emotion-detecting technology  – Slate Oh shit, now tech can read our emotions – time to get ahead of it, this Slate piece argues. Not sure we know how to, I might retort.

The Promise of a New Internet – The Atlantic Maybe it doesn’t have to all come down to a place controlled by the NSA, Facebook, and Apple. Maybe mesh networking can save the core values of the Internet after all?

Facebook to Let Users Alter Their Ad Profiles – NYTimes.com I chose this version of the story because it’s such an amazing win for Facebook from a spin point of view. Other headlines: Facebook to Use Web Browsing History For Ad Targeting and Facebook’s New Ads Are Nosier Than Ever. Get my point?!

Is Tony Fadell the next Steve Jobs or … the next Larry Page? – Fortune Or are we simply building him up because it makes a good headline? Seriously, Fadell is a talented executive, and this is a good profile of a key guy in the tech scene.

Window into Airbnb’s hidden impact on S.F. – San Francisco Chronicle Look what a little data-driven journalism yields – insights into how Airbnb is changing the SF landscape.