free html hit counter Early Lessons From My Mobile Deep Dive: The Quickening Is Nigh - John Battelle's Search Blog

Early Lessons From My Mobile Deep Dive: The Quickening Is Nigh

By - September 06, 2014
chiclets

Do you really want to eat them one at a time? Me, I prefer mashing ’em up.

Recently I began a walkabout of sorts, with a goal of ameliorating my rather thin understanding of the mobile marketplace. If you read me closely, you know I’ve been more than frustrated with what I call the “chicletized world” of disconnected mobile apps. It’s rise was so counter to everything I loved about the Internet, I’m afraid as a result I underestimated its impact on that very world.

My corrective starting point – the metaphorical bit of yarn upon which I felt compelled to tug  – was the impact of “deep linking” on the overall ecosystem. The phrase has something of a  “dark pool” feel to it, but it’s actually a rather mundane concept: Developers tag their mobile apps and – if relevant – their complementary websites – with a linking structure that allows others to link directly into various points of entry into their applications. This is why, for example, you can jump from a Google search for “Tycho” on your phone to the “Tycho” page inside your Spotify app.

So far, I’ve had more than a dozen or so meetings and phone calls on the subject, and I’ve begun to formulate some working theses about what’s happening out there. While my education continues, here are some initial findings:

1. Deep linking is indeed a Very Big Deal. Nearly all the folks I spoke with believed deep linking in mobile was the beginning of something important, something I’ve started to call…

2. The Quickening… which I believe is nearly upon us. Mobile app developers are humans driven by business goals. If the business opportunity is large, but proscribed by narrow rules, they will follow those rules to gain the initial opportunity. For example, when the convener of a new market (Apple) imposes strict rules about how data is shared, and how apps must behave with regard to each other, app builders will initially conform, and behaviors will fall narrowly in line for a cycle or two (in this case, about five years). However, once those rules prove burdensome, businesses will look for ways around them. This is happening in mobile, for reasons that come down to new competitive players (primarily Android) and to a maturation in distribution, revenue, and engagement models (more on that below). The end result: The market is about to enter a phase of “quickening” – a rapid increase in linking between apps and web-like backends, harkening a new ecosystem in which both foreseeable and unforseen “life” will be created.

2. App Installs Rule. Till They Don’t. The market for mobile apps is – predictably – driven by app installs. And unless you’re the teen viral sensation of the moment, the only reliable way to get app installs is to buy them – almost exclusively via advertising on mobile devices. Facebook figured this out, and holy cow, did the market love that. But app makers are now realizing they have to do more than get their app installed. It’s actually just as critical to get their current installed base to actually engage with their app – lest it be forever relegated to the dustbin that is our current (deeply crappy) mobile desktop metaphor.  Hence the rise of  “re-engagement advertising,” which is serving as something akin to search-engine marketing (SEM) in the desktop web.  Several folks I spoke to told me that 80% of the money in mobile advertising is in app installs, but they quickly cautioned that installs are a house of cards which will not be sustained absent the rise of re-engagement advertising.

3. We’ve Seen This Movie. Which got me thinking. Jeez, have we ever seen this movie before. It’s called publishing. You can buy crappy circulation, crappy audiences, and crappy one-time visitors, and you can also buy great audiences, but the true gauge of a publication, a service, or an app is whether folks keep coming back. And even if you have a great app/service/publication, you need to remind them of your existence more than a few times before they are hooked (this is why classic magazine circulation has three phases – marketing, sampling, and conversion). The link-economy of the open web allowed this process to happen rather naturally, but there is no such economy in mobile, at least not yet. Thanks to early decision made by the conveners of the mobile ecosystem, mobile is deeply shitty at providing business owners with a way of reminding consumers about the value of their proposition, which is why they are frantic for some kind of channel for doing just that. This leads me to hypothesize that…

4. The App Store’s Days Are Limited. Remember when Yahoo! owned Web 1.0, because it had the entire Web in its directory? Or when Google owned Web 2.0, because it put the entire web in RAM? Yep, both those models created massive companies, along with massive ecosystems, but neither hegemony lasted forever. Apple’s App Store (and Google’s) are subject to the same forces. The model may be dominant, but it’s not going to last. As one senior executive in mobile media put it: “The app store is a weigh station, not an end point.” What might replace the App Store as a model for distribution? That’s a fine question, and one I don’t have a strong opinion about, at least not yet. But I sense the Quickening will lay the groundwork for new vectors of app adoption and engagement, similar – but not identical  – to the link economy of the web. Which is why I believe…

5. Re-engagement ads open the door to new topologies (and economics) across mobile. A pretty obvious point, if you’ve managed to stay with me to this point, but one I think is worth restatement and elaboration. Re-engagement advertising is driven by a fundamental business (and consumer) need, and Facebook, Twitter, Apple, Yahoo!, and Google are all responding with deep linking topologies that enable re-engagement. This is a relatively new development, and it’s hard to predict where it might go. But one thing’s for sure – deep linking is good for both the developer and the consumer. It’s just a better experience to go directly into the exact right place inside an app that’s already on your phone. And for marketers, deep linking enables far superior “landing pages” inside their apps, driving a conversion path that is measurable and repeatable. It’s not hard to imagine that re-engagement is the beginning of a more robust economic model for mobile, one that will re-integrate much of the goodness we created when the Web broke wide open ten or more years ago. And that makes me wonder if….

6. The home screen of “chiclets” is mutable. Broadly established consumer engagement models don’t shift rapidly, and the colorful, 16×16 sudoku model of App World isn’t going away anytime soon.  But do we really believe we’ll be poking at squares representing apps forever? I don’t. A more fluid experience based on declared and modeled intent makes a lot more sense – one in which we flow seamlessly from need to need, serviced in each state by a particular application without having to pull back, chose a new app, and then dive back in. I’ve not yet spoken to many UX/UI folks, but I sense this is coming, and deep linking is a first step in enabling it. Somehow, I sense that…

7. Search is key to all of this. Hey, this is Searchblog, after all. It strikes me that search on mobile is pretty broken, because it forces the entirety of the web onto a model that has far more specific – and useful – parameters to work with. The signals emanating from a mobile phone give search entirely new use cases, but so far, we’ve got precious little to show for it. This can’t stand for long.

I’ve got a lot more thinking going on, but it’s too nascent to be of much use at the moment. Topics I’m also thinking about include mapping the dependencies of the mobile ecosystem, grokking the concept of “agency” and how it relates to search and mobile data,  the role of programmatic in mobile, and understanding the flow of money between the big platforms and the little guys.

As you can probably tell, my comprehension of this space is still very limited, but I hope this update sparks some of your own thinking, and that you might share those insights with me in comments or via email or other forms of media. I will continue my walkabout in coming weeks, and I’ll keep writing about it here. Thanks for reading.

And thanks to the many folks I spoke with so far, many of whom are working on stealth projects or agreed to our conversations on background. Hence, I’ve not quoted anyone directly, but again, thanks, and you know who you are!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

8 thoughts on “Early Lessons From My Mobile Deep Dive: The Quickening Is Nigh

  1. Scott Lyon says:

    John, very thoughtful. I have a few initial responses but am also still firming up my views:
    1. These single use case “chiclet” apps fail us yes because they are disjointed from the more “fluid” and “dynamic” decisionmaking you refer to but also because they are dumb, ie know not enough about us to be dangerous. I tell Goodreads I like Haruki Murakami, Hertz that I prefer satellite radio when I travel, and maybe flag a picture of Portugal on Pinterest because I want to go there someday. But because there’s no aggregate profile of “Scott” with all my transactions/vital signs/preferences/etc God help you if you try to plan a family vacation or something. Therefore I believe:
    2. A more sophisticated ecosystem won’t emerge until we empower an entity – Googlezon? – to house all this data and enable us to data mine ourselves and make more enlightened/holistic decisions. Maybe I want to go to Portugal but ONLY if I can get there a) under a certain price point b) during specific blocks of time c) after immersing myself in the best foreign language program for 30 days prior. Oh and need to schedule rock solid WiFi so I can take a break in middle of trip and reconnect with home office/clients.
    3. As an aside, I don’t think in the non mobile world there is a truly Scott-informed life-management service either. Hell I sometimes have 3-4 web sites open just to figure out when/where my son’s lacrosse game is and whether I should pick up his brother before or after the event. So this need for a concierge life-optimizer is acute, and could be a transformative business opportunity. Something that dynamically sources the data and service providers needed for me to best accomplish my goal. Hence all the whirr and hum about Uber API right?

    • jbat says:

      Scott good points. I think the entity is “us” – each of us approving and allowing apps to connect to each other and leverage information one to the other. And yes, some other third party that tracks it all and give us control….

  2. Gian Fulgoni says:

    John: Thanks for a most interesting read. I think you’ll be intrigued by what we’ve found at comScore regarding app usage. While there are millions of apps out there, an individual actually uses very few. On average, 42% of an individual’s mobile app engagement occurs using the person’s favorite app while 75% occurs using an individual’s four most popular apps. So, the challenge for any marketer is to not only get their apps downloaded but also to get them used. The full report is here: http://www.comscore.com/Insights/Presentations-and-Whitepapers/2014/The-US-Mobile-App-Report

    Gian

    • jbat says:

      Yes, Gian, I’ve read the Comscore study a few times! It proves the need for a more robust engagement strategy, and I am sure it’s in countless entrepreneur’s decks who are seeking funding for their re-engagement play….among many other thing!

  3. Luke says:

    Worth a look at Wildcard (http://www.trywildcard.com/) and a chat with Jordan Cooper.

  4. Slaven Radic says:

    Great post Joh, 100% agree. Just for completeness, there is also such a thing as a deep link that works even when the app is not yet installed. It’s called a deferred deep link and enables linking into apps for new users.

    (my company Tapstream supports them with our product Onboarding Links)

  5. Phil Dearson says:

    I enjoyed your article, John. Then I found Deeplink, a startup providing an app deep linking service. I don’t know them but thought I’d let you know – https://deeplink.me