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Web 2 Map: The Data Layer – Visualizing the Big Players in the Internet Economy

By - June 03, 2011

As I wrote last month, I’m working with a team of folks to redesign the Web 2 Points of Control map along the lines of this year’s theme: “The Data Frame.” In the past few weeks I’ve been talking to scores of interesting people, including CEOs of data-driven start ups (TrialPay and Corda, for example), academics in the public dataspace, policy folks, and VCs. Along the way I’ve solidified my thinking about how best to visualize the “data layer” we’ll be adding to the map, and I wanted to bounce it off all of you. So here, in my best narrative voice, is what I’m thinking.

First, of course, some data.

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On the left hand side are eight major players in the Internet Economy, along with two categories of players who are critical, but who I’ve lumped together – payment players such as Visa, Amex, and Mastercard, and carriers or ISP players such as Comcast, AT&T, and Verizon.

I’ve given each company my own “finger in the air” score for seven major data categories, which are shown across the top (I don’t claim these are correct, rather, clay on the wheel for an ongoing dialog). The first six scores are in essence percentages, answering the question “What percentage of this company’s holdings are in this type of data.” The seventh, which I’ve called Wildcard data, is a 1-10 ranking of the potency of that company’s “wildcard” data that it’s not currently leveraging, but might in the future. I’ll get to more detail on each data category later.

Toward the far right, I’ve noted each company’s overall global uniques (from Doubleclick, for now, save the carriers and payment guys – I’ve proxied their size with the reach of Google). There is also an “engagement” score (again, more on that soon). The final score is a very rough tabulation computing engagement over uniques against the sum of the data scores. There are pivots to be built from this data around each of the scores for various types of data, but I’ll leave that for later. This is meant to be a relatively simple introduction to my rough thinking about the data layer. Hopefully, it’ll spark some input from you.

Now, before you rip it apart, which I fully invite (especially those of you who are data quants, because I am clearly not, and I am likely mixing some apples and watermelons here), allow me to continue to narrate what I’m trying to visualize here.

As you know, the map is a metaphor, showing key territories as “points of control.” The companies I’ve highlighted in the chart all have “home territories” where they dominate a sector – Google in search, Facebook in social, Amazon and eBay in commerce, etc. What I plan to do is create a layer based on the data in the chart that, when activated, shows those companies’ relative size and strength.

But how?

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Well, the best idea we’ve come up with so far is to show each as a small city of sorts, where the relative height of the buildings is determined by a corresponding data point. So Twitter, for example, will have a tall building in the middle of its city, representing “Interest data.” Google’s tallest building will be search. Facebook’s, social, and so on. And of course the cities can’t be all on the same scale, hence our use of total global uniques, and total engagement. Yahoo may be nearly as big as Facebook, but it doesn’t have nearly the engagement per user. So its city will be smaller, relatively, than Facebook’s.

What is interesting about this approach is that each company’s “cityscape” emerges as distinct. Microsoft’s is wide but not tall – they have a lot of data in a number of areas. It will probably end up looking like a suburban office park – funnily enough, that’s what Microsoft really looks like, for the most part. Amazon and eBay will have high towers of payment data, with a smattering of shorter buildings. And so on. I don’t have a good visualization of this yet, but the designers at Blend, who I’m working with, have sketched out a very rough early version just so you can get the idea. The structures will be more whimsical, and of course be keyed with color. But I think you get the idea.

I’m even thinking of adding other features, like “openness” – ie can you access, gain copies of, share, and mash up the data controlled by each company? If so, the city won’t be walled. Apple, on the other hand, may well end up a walled city, with a moat, on top of a hill.

Now, a bit more detail on the data categories. You all gave me a lot of really good input on my earlier post, where I posited these original categories. But I’ve kept them the same, save the addition of the wildcard data. Why? Because I think each can be interpreted as larger buckets containing a lot of other data. I’ll go through each briefly in turn:

Purchase Data: This is information about who buys what, in essence. But it’s also who *almost* buys what (abandoned carts), *when* they buy, in what context, and so on.

Search Data: The original database of intentions – query data, path from query data, “intent” data, and tons more search signals.

Social Data: Social graph, but also identity data. Not to mention how people interact inside their graphs, etc.

Interest Data: This is data that describes what is generally called “the interest graph” – declarations of what people are interested in. It’s related to content, but it’s not just content consumption. It includes active production of interest datapoints – like tweets, status updates, checkins, etc.

Location Data: This is data about where people are, to be sure, but also data about how often we are there, and other correlated data – ie what apps we use in location context, who else is there and when, etc.

Content Data: Content is still a king in our world, and knowing patterns of content consumption is a powerful signal. This is data about who reads/watches/consumes what, when, and in what patterns.

Wildcard Data: This is data that is uncategorized, but could have huge implications. For example, Microsoft knows how people interact with their applications and OS. Microsoft and Google have a ton of language data (phonemes, etc.). Carriers see just about everything that passes across their servers, though their ability to use it might be regulated. Google, Yahoo and Microsoft have tons of email interaction data. And so on….

Now, of course all these data categories get more powerful as they are leveraged one against the other, and of course, I’ve left tons of really big data players off the map entirely (Tons of small startups like Tynt, Quora, or Sharethis have massive amounts of data, as do very large companies like Nielsen, Quantcast, etc.). But you have to make choices to make something like this work.

So, that’s where we are with the Web 2 Summit map data layer. Naturally, once the data layer is live, it will be driven by a database, so we can tweak the size and scope of the cities and buildings based on the collective intelligence of the map users’ feedback. What do you think? What’s your input? We’ll be building this over the next two months, and I’d love your feedback before we get too far down the line. Thanks!

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Facebook's Carolyn Everson: “We’re one percent done on our ad products.”

By - June 02, 2011

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When Facebook announced it had convinced Carolyn Everson to leave Microsoft to head sales at the pre-IPO social networking giant, a few eyebrows lifted: Everson had only been at Microsoft for nine months, and was recruited there by CEO Steve Ballmer after he watched her work to integrate an important deal between Microsoft and MTV, where she previously worked.

While Microsoft could not have been pleased it lost a key sales executive, at least Everson was going to a friend of sorts: Microsoft owns a chunk of Facebook stock, and has been busy leveraging Facebook data into its upstart search engine Bing.

Everson and I spoke last month as a prelude to our onstage conversation next week at the CM Summit. She repeated one of her early statements about Facebook’s advertising potential – “We’re one percent done” – and we spoke abut Facebook’s “branded stories” product, which lets companies put social activity related to the brand directly into Facebook advertisements (I ribbed her about how FM has been doing something similar for years, but of course, FM has about 10% of Facebook’s scale).

There are no shortage of questions to get into with Everson, including Facebook’s rumored push into content – something CEO Mark Zuckerberg implied was inevitable in recent public speeches. And then there’s the always rumored “Facesense” – a Facebook-data driven ad network for third party publishers that would take on Google’s display business. And of course, the recent launch of Facebook Deals, a Groupon competitor that is super focused on the local advertising marketplace.

And then there’s the question of privacy. While Zuckerberg has a clear philosophy on the question, and most likely it’s shared by a large percentage of his customers, advertisers are usually far more sensitive to how they use data, and, oddly enough, at far larger risk of regulatory backlash. And of course privacy laws are not only in flux (there are half a dozen or so proposed pieces of legislation in the US alone), but they vary greatly from country to country.

Lastly, there’s the rumored 2012 IPO, and with it the pressures of making quarterly numbers. As global sales chief, that responsibility falls to Everson.

In short, there are plenty of things to discuss, and that’s why I’ve asked Everson to be our last speaker at CM Summit, so if we go a bit long, we’re not bumping anyone else off the stage. Let me know if there’s anything you’d like me to ask her.

As a reminder, we’ll hear from more than 30 presenters at CM Summit, 11 of which will be one-one interviews. Those include:

Visa CMO Antonio Lucio: Our Business Is Digital, Period

The in.imit.able will.i.am: Embracing Brand As An Artist

Google’s Neal Mohan: A $200 Billion Opportunity

Reimagining Yahoo!: Chief Product Officer Blake Irving

Filmmaker Tiffany Shlain Declares Interdependence: The Internet Is Changing How We Think

The Colorful Bill Nguyen: The Market Will Come

The Swan Song of Mich Matthews, Outgoing Chief of Marketing at Microsoft

Taking Twitter to the Next Level: President of Global Revenue Adam Bain

On the Future of Media: Starcom MediaVest Group CEO Laura Desmond

I’ll be adding my final post on Demand CEO Richard Rosenblatt in the next 24 hours, as we are speaking later today.

The CM Summit is less than one week away, and nearly 500 folks have registered – it’s just about sold out….so register today before we do.

Special thanks to our sponsors: Blackberry, AT&T, Google, Quantcast, Demand Media, Facebook, Outbrain, Pandora, Pixazza, R2integrated, Slideshare, Yahoo!, AOL, American Express OPEN, Balloon, BriefLogic, Evidon, Marketing Evolution/Telmar, Mobile Roadie, Spiceworks, and Ustream. And a shout out to our partners at IAB, Mashable, paidContent, ReadWriteWeb, SMAC, and TechZulu.

Visa CMO Antonio Lucio: Our Business Is Digital, Period

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If you Google “Antonio Lucio CMO Visa”, as I did in preparation for my conversation with him next week at CM Summit, the first several links which show up are headlined : “Google Hater – Visa CMO Antonio Lucio Slams Giant.”

The headline isn’t really reflective of Lucio’s views on Google, but there you have it. For most casual observers, Lucio is a firebrand calling out the largest force in digital marketing today.

I think what instead we’ll find on stage is a thoughtful marketer who has a clear agenda for making the transition to digital. And unlike many of his counterparts in consumer packed goods or auto, for example, he’s also at a firm whose very existence is challenged by the Internet. Visa, after all, is a payment processing business, a middleman, as it were, and if other middlemen find a more efficient way to execute what Visa does, well, Visa is threatened.

Lately those threats have gotten very real. Facebook, Google, Paypal, Amex, along with startups like Square and TrialPay are all looking to take Visa’s business, not to mention the threat of commercial banks like Chase and Citi, long Visa’s partners.

In short, the market is up for grabs, and product differentiation will be key. Lucio knows this, and we’ll be talking about it front and center next week. Sure, Visa will have to partner (it’s invested in Square, which some say wants to disrupt Visa’s business, for example) and build out new and innovative product offerings as plastic goes the way of the compact disc (Visa recently announced an NFC-based Digital Wallet initiative).

But where the brand will really have to pivot is in meaning more than “an easy way to pay.”

Key to that is social, Lucio told me. He recently delivered a message to all the marketers in his organization titled “The Three Principles of Social Media.” They are: “1) Sharing is the new giving; 2) Participation is the new engagement; and 3) Recommendations are the new advertising.” Expect Lucio to unpack each in our conversation.

Lucio certainly walks the walk when it comes to digital spending: nearly 40% of Visa’s annual marketing spend is in digital. Two years ago, that figure was 12%. He also wants to shake up how he works with his agencies – he directs his team to work directly with media and audiences first, then agencies. Them’s fighting words to many in the agency world.

Tell me in comments what you might want to hear from Lucio as I interview him next week.

As a reminder, we’ll hear from more than 30 presenters at CM Summit, 11 of which will be one-one interviews. Those include:

The in.imit.able will.i.am: Embracing Brand As An Artist

Google’s Neal Mohan: A $200 Billion Opportunity

Reimagining Yahoo!: Chief Product Officer Blake Irving

Filmmaker Tiffany Shlain Declares Interdependence: The Internet Is Changing How We Think

The Colorful Bill Nguyen: The Market Will Come

The Swan Song of Mich Matthews, Outgoing Chief of Marketing at Microsoft

Taking Twitter to the Next Level: President of Global Revenue Adam Bain

On the Future of Media: Starcom MediaVest Group CEO Laura Desmond

I’ll be adding posts on the remaining folks – Demand CEO Richard Rosenblatt, and Facebook’s Carolyn Everson, shortly.

The CM Summit is less than one week away, and nearly 450 folks have registered, we can only take 500….so register today before we sell out.

Special thanks to our sponsors: Blackberry, AT&T, Google, Quantcast, Demand Media, Facebook, Outbrain, Pandora, Pixazza, R2integrated, Slideshare, Yahoo!, AOL, American Express OPEN, Balloon, BriefLogic, Evidon, Marketing Evolution/Telmar, Mobile Roadie, Spiceworks, and Ustream. And a shout out to our partners at IAB, Mashable, paidContent, ReadWriteWeb, SMAC, and TechZulu.

The in.imit.able will.i.am: Embracing Brand As An Artist

By - June 01, 2011


Next week will mark the third time in one year that I’ve interviewed Black Eyed Peas frontman will.i.am on stage, and each time it’s gotten better. If you’re coming to CM Summit, you’re in for a treat. Will is in New York for a benefit concert in Central Park, and he’s stopping by to chat with us along the way.

I’ve found will.i.am to be a rare bird – a massively successful commercial artist who embraces brands and marketing as part of his work, instead of a distraction from his work. He reminds me of another William – William Gibson, an author who natively embraces marketing as part of a narrative, finding signal in the work of branding, rather than noise. And no one can argue with Will’s street cred, his philanthropic work is a model for all celebrities. Not to mention, the dude is director of innovation at Intel. Intel!

If you want a preview of what we’ll be talking about, check the interview we did back in February at Signal LA. Expect more of the same, with a few twists, when we meet in New York next week.

As a reminder, we’ll hear from more than 30 presenters at CM Summit, 11 of which will be one-one interviews. Those include:

Google’s Neal Mohan: A $200 Billion Opportunity

Reimagining Yahoo!: Chief Product Officer Blake Irving

Filmmaker Tiffany Shlain Declares Interdependence: The Internet Is Changing How We Think

The Colorful Bill Nguyen: The Market Will Come

The Swan Song of Mich Matthews, Outgoing Chief of Marketing at Microsoft

Taking Twitter to the Next Level: President of Global Revenue Adam Bain

On the Future of Media: Starcom MediaVest Group CEO Laura Desmond

I’ll be adding posts on the remaining folks – Demand CEO Richard Rosenblatt, Visa CMO Antonio Lucio, and Facebook’s Carolyn Everson, shortly.

The CM Summit is less than one week away, and nearly 450 folks have registered, we can only take 500….so register today before we sell out.

Special thanks to our sponsors: Blackberry, AT&T, Google, Quantcast, Demand Media, Facebook, Outbrain, Pandora, Pixazza, R2integrated, Slideshare, Yahoo!, AOL, American Express OPEN, Balloon, BriefLogic, Evidon, Marketing Evolution/Telmar, Mobile Roadie, Spiceworks, and Ustream. And a shout out to our partners at IAB, Mashable, paidContent, ReadWriteWeb, SMAC, and TechZulu.

Filmmaker Tiffany Shlain Declares Interdependence: The Internet Is Changing How We Think

By - May 31, 2011

tiffany.jpgOne of the curveball sessions I’m most looking forward to at next week’s CM Summit is with filmmaker Tiffany Shlain, whose recent documentary features “Connected” was selected for inclusion at Sundance (and many other prestigious festivals.) Today I jumped on the phone with Shlain, who has been a fellow traveler since the days when I started The Industry Standard and she founded The Webbys. We’ve both moved on from those heady days, but find our work is once again interconnecting – “Connected” is an essentially optimistic but cautious story of Tiffany’s own life, work, and passions, in particular as it relates to her relationship with her father, a renown physician and author who spent much of his life searching for patterns in human behavior which transcended traditional boundaries of academic pursuit.

In short, the film is a call for all of us to move past our current frame of thinking, and to leverage the moment we are in to embrace a new philosophy – that of interdependence. The axis of this movement is the Internet, Shlain argues, and we have it within our grasp to leverage digital networks to solve the extraordinary problems we’ve collectively created through, well, collective creation.

Shlain was in a good mood as we began our conversation – she had recently learned her film had been picked up for national theatrical distribution in the Fall. That’s a big deal for a committed independent filmmaker, to be certain, but it’s also something of a quandry – theatrical distribution is “how films are normally done” and Shlain has plenty of unique ideas about how to get her work out into the world.

We’ll be talking about some of those ideas, which range from using Facebook to drive local screenings, to a mobile app specifically for the film, to continuing the film as a conversation across the web through the creation of three-minute “follow-up” films, the first of which will be crowdsourced through YouTube.

As I asked earlier about Bill Nguyen, why have Shlain at a digital marketing conference? Well, “Connected” is certainly about the impact of the Internet on our lives. But also because, as Tiffany says in her film, “emotional connection drives everything we do.” Marketers need to be reminded of this from time to time, in particular in the context of the constant, real time connections for which all brands are now the stewards. It struck me as somehow appropriate to have an artist grace our stage, and I’m thrilled Tiffany has agreed to join us.

The CM Summit is just one week away….so register today before we sell out.

Special thanks to our sponsors: Blackberry, AT&T, Google, Quantcast, Demand Media, Facebook, Outbrain, Pandora, Pixazza, R2integrated, Slideshare, Yahoo!, AOL, American Express OPEN, Balloon, BriefLogic, Evidon, Marketing Evolution/Telmar, Mobile Roadie, Spiceworks, and Ustream. And a shout out to our partners at IAB, Mashable, paidContent, ReadWriteWeb, SMAC, and TechZulu.


The Colorful Bill Nguyen: The Market Will Come

By - May 30, 2011

Bill_Nguyen_headshot_png_100x100_sharpen_q100.jpgIn preparation for our short onstage discussion at CM Summit next week, I recently hopped on the phone with Color founder and CEO Bill Nguyen. Color, ostensibly a social-photo app, is backed by big money and saddled with huge expectations. It launched with great fanfare in March. I wrote glowingly of its potential here. I got a fair amount of sh*t for being too rosy in my estimation of the service’s potential. By April, Color had been written off as a failed effort by much of the blogosphere, and folks moved on to the next shiny object.

None of this seems to bother Nguyen, who’s been around the block a few times more than your average startup bear. He sees a wave rising in the distance, and he’s building Color to ride it. Whether or not others see the wave is not particularly interesting to him. As far as he’s concerned, it’s coming. Folks will get on board when the time is right.

So what is the wave? It’s a pivot in the fundamental organizing principle of how social networks work. He wants to move social past the friend network. Nguyen is certain that Facebook, for all its power, is stuck in a limited model – a poorly instrumented friend graph that you set up once, then run forever. I’ve called this the “instrumentation problem” of Facebook – it simply does not allow the nuance of true social interaction.

To Nguyen’s mind, the next wave of social will be driven by proximity. By that, he means by people who are near other people. If you’ve ever seen that famous video of a festival flash dance, you know how quickly human beings can create social groups. Color is meant to be an app that understands this essential human nature, “appify it”, and add value to it in various ways. His first choice was photos, but that’s really just a proxy for any number of things folks might want to share and relate to as a group (and as members of that group even when not together). Over time, these shared social group objects become intermingled with physical locations, and all sorts of goodness ensues.

However, if you’re going to make an essentially social service, as Color is, you can’t ignore Facebook. Color 1.0 did just that. I expect the next version will not. Facebook is the oxygen in today’s social web. Unless you plan on beating Facebook head to head, it’s best to beat it by joining it.

Nguyen’s goals for Color are very, very big, and getting there will require a lot of work, a lot of capital, and a lot of assumptions that will have to prove out over time. One of them is that Facebook won’t add Color-like features to its service. But while Nguyen told me adding proximity features to Facebook should be “mission critical,” he doesn’t see the social networking giant focusing on it in the near term. He’s probably right.

So why have Color and Nguyen at a conference about digital marketing? Because I see one of our jobs at FM as pushing all of us to think about how the world of human relationships might look three to five years out. Remember, five years ago, Facebook was a curiosity. It pays to pay attention to very smart folks building tools they don’t expect will be fully scaled till the year 2015 or so. Nguyen is one of those folks.

Oh, and at scale, Color would be one hell of a marketing channel. Bill’s got a few thoughts about that as well.

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The CM Summit is just one week away….so register today before we sell out.

Special thanks to our sponsors: Blackberry, AT&T, Google, Quantcast, Demand Media, Facebook, Outbrain, Pandora, Pixazza, R2integrated, Slideshare, Yahoo!, AOL, American Express OPEN, Balloon, BriefLogic, Evidon, Marketing Evolution/Telmar, Mobile Roadie, Spiceworks, and Ustream. And a shout out to our partners at IAB, Mashable, paidContent, ReadWriteWeb, SMAC, and TechZulu.

The Swan Song of Mich Matthews, Outgoing Chief of Marketing at Microsoft

By - May 27, 2011

mich-matthews-microsoft-marketing-head.jpgAfter a 22-year career helming communications and later all of central marketing for Microsoft – she counts her budgets with a “b”, folks – Mich Matthews, who I admit I’ve grown fond of, is leaving Microsoft later this summer.

For years I’ve asked Mich to sit down with me and endure one of my trademark grillings, and for years she’s demurred, in the main because she believes that the CMO should not be a front person. “You’re an onstage guy,” she told me when we last spoke. “I’m the person pulling the ropes backstage.”

Well, maybe because she’s leaving, and maybe because she’s exploring what comes next (she honestly doesn’t know, but has an inkling), Mich has finally agreed to speak her mind on stage, and if our prep conversation earlier this week was any indication, it’s going to be one hell of a swan song.

Mich opens Day Two of the sixth annual CM Summit in NY just 10 short days from now. And she’ll have some serious stories to tell.

For example, it was Mich in the wings as her boss Bill Gates arrogantly defied the US Justice Department in a disastrous videotaped antitrust deposition in the late 1990s. Not very many people saw that video – but imagine, as Mich certainly has, if that video had gone viral on YouTube. “Thank God YouTube didn’t exist,” Mich told me. Today’s leaders in key areas – search and social, for example – are headed for equally fateful outcomes if they don’t heed the lessons of how the USS Microsoft foundered on the shoals of government policy.

Mich, who in private has always been extraordinarily candid, is ready for her next chapter. When I asked how she felt, she told me “Like I just got a degree in awesome from the University of Awesomeness.” It’s not that working at Microsoft was terrible, but rather that after putting in more than two decades, she had earned the right to look at the world from a new perspective.

It will be that point of view I”ll be asking about first, and then we’ll get into some history, as well as some prognostications about the industry in general. Lest we forget, this is the woman responsible for taking Bing and marketing it to a more than 100% share increase in less than two years. The person responsible for fighting off Google in office apps, Apple in mobile, Sony and Nintendo in gaming, Oracle and scores of others in Enterprise, and, and, and…She’s got war stories, and she’s got lessons learned.

In fact, I’m thinking about giving her opening session more time, as I know we’ll run out of it too soon.

Oh, and PS – Register today before we sell out. It’s getting close!

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Special thanks to our sponsors: Blackberry, AT&T, Google, Quantcast, Demand Media, Facebook, Outbrain, Pandora, Pixazza, R2integrated, Slideshare, Yahoo!, AOL, American Express OPEN, Balloon, BriefLogic, Evidon, Marketing Evolution/Telmar, Mobile Roadie, Spiceworks, and Ustream. And a shout out to our partners at IAB, Mashable, paidContent, ReadWriteWeb, SMAC, and TechZulu.

On the Future of Media: Starcom MediaVest Group CEO Laura Desmond

By - May 24, 2011

ThDesmond_PREFERRED_1.jpge sixth annual CM Summit is just two weeks away, and that means I’m knee deep in prep: thinking about the major themes driving our industry, and in particular, those driving media and marketing.

This is why I’m so pleased that our opening conversation will be with Laura Desmond, the CEO of Starcom MediaVest Group, one of the largest buyers of media in the world. SMG recently made news by winning Microsoft’s lucrative business in the US, and counts P&G, Walmart, Coca Cola, and GM amongst its all star roster of clients.

In short, Desmond has a front row seat to the changes happening in media and marketing today, and from the notes I took in our prep call earlier this week, our onstage conversation should be compelling. Some of the topics we’ll be covering:

- The “consumerization of IT.” As technology becomes integrated into all of our lives, large business to business marketers like Microsoft and Oracle are contending with changing demands of their customers in the workplace. Conversely, the large consumer packaged goods companies like P&G must become IT companies, as consumers demand they respond as nimbly as the Amazons, Googles, and Netflixs of the world.

- Brands as publishers. This is the theme I’ve been writing and preaching about since the founding of Federated Media in 2005, but it’s taken center stage with major marketers this year, according to Desmond. Brands need to become curators, filters, and providers of consumer experiences, she argues, and they need to work in new ways with traditional publishers to get there.

- The shift of media budgets from television to digital. This is the elephant in the room everyone can see, but no one can shoot. While the big five digital platforms command nearly 80% of digital budgets, the truth is, television brand dollars still rule the roost. Why? Desmond has some answers, and expect to hear a call for the end of “market mix modeling,” a practice which began in the 1950s and has barely changed since.

- The role of demand side platforms, real time bidding, third party data, and exchanges in today’s evolving market, an issue which dominated the Interactive Advertising Bureau’s annual meeting and conference earlier this year.

There’s a world of issues to cover off in our opening conversation, and with more than 30 speakers from GM, Visa, Sony, Google, Facebook, Twitter, and more joining us on stage across one and a half days, our goal is to give CM Summit attendees a high-level look at the business of marketing, in a rapid-fire conference that will keep folks on the edge of their seats.

Register today before we sell out. And if you have a question you’d like me to ask Laura, leave a comment here or join the conversation on the #CMSummit hashtag. See you in New York!

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Special thanks to our sponsors: Blackberry, AT&T, Google, Quantcast, Demand Media, Facebook, Outbrain, Pandora, Pixazza, R2integrated, Slideshare, Yahoo!, AOL, American Express OPEN, Balloon, BriefLogic, Evidon, Marketing Evolution/Telmar, Mobile Roadie, Spiceworks, and Ustream. And a shout out to our partners at IAB, Mashable, paidContent.org, ReadWriteWeb, SMAC, and TechZulu.

Initial Web 2 Summit Lineup Announced

By - May 11, 2011

Today we announced the first tranche of speakers for this year’s Web 2 Summit conference, Oct. 17-19 at the Palace Hotel. It’s a great group, but we’re really only getting started. I’m mixing up the programming approach quite a bit this year, with no panels and a lot more short, impactful High Order Bits and data visualizations. Right now we have 26 or so speakers confirmed, but I expect we’ll be at nearly three times that by the time we’re done. The program is going to be BANG BANG BANG, not that it dragged in the past….

One new thing I’ll be doing as well is forming an advisory board. More on that soon, but my goal is to gather input on the program from a diverse set of voices. This is something I did way back when we started in 2004, it felt right to do it again.

You’ll notice the lineup has a fair share of the industry heavyweights you might expect me to interview (Steve Ballmer, Dick Costolo, Steven Elop, Michael Dell, etc), as well as some names that perhaps you have not heard of (Intel anthropologist Genevieve Bell, “The Information” author James Gleick, etc.). In the coming months, I’ll be announcing new additions pretty frequently, mainly through Twitter, so if you want to stay on top of them, follow me or the Web 2 Summit handle.

Below are the speakers in visual form.

Registration is open, if you want to come, now’s the time, as you get a far better price. We’ve sold out registration every year since 2004.The link at left includes the discount, which lasts, if I recall, only for a short time. Hope to see you there!

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Building A New Map And I Need Your Help: What Are The Key Categories of Data In Today's Network Economy?

By - May 04, 2011

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Many of you probably remember the “Points of Control” Web 2 Summit Map from last year, it was very well received. Hundreds of thousands of folks came to check it out, and the average engagement time was north of six minutes per visitor. It was a really fun way to make the conference theme come to life, and given the work that went into its creation, we thought it’d be a shame to retire it simply because Web 2 has moved on to a new theme.

As I posted last week, this year’s theme is “The Data Frame.” From my updated verbiage describing the theme:

For 2011, our theme is “The Data Frame” - focusing on the impact of data in today’s networked economy. We live in a world clothed in data, and as we interact with it, we create more – data is not only the web’s core resource, it is at once both renewable and boundless.


Consumers now create and consume extraordinary amounts of data. Hundreds of millions of mobile phones weave infinite tapestries of data, in real time. Each purchase, search, status update, and check-in layers our world with more of it. How our industries respond to this opportunity will define not only success and failure in the networked economy, but also the future texture of our culture. And as we’re already seeing, these interactions raise complicated questions of consumer privacy, corporate trust, and our governments’ approach to balancing the two.

How, I wondered, might we update the Points of Control map such that it can express this theme? Well, first of all, it’s clear the game is still afoot between the major players. Some boundaries may have moved, and progress has been made (Bing has gained search share, Facebook and Google have moved into social commerce, etc.), but the map in essence is intact as a thought piece.

Then it struck me – each of the major players, and most of the upstarts, have as a core asset in their arsenals *data*, often many types of it. In addition, most of them covet data that they’ve either not got access to, or are in the process of building out (think Google in social, for example, or in deals, which to my mind is a major play for local as well as purchase data.) Why not apply the “Data Frame” to the map itself, a lens of sorts that when overlaid upon the topography, shows the data assets and aspirations of each player?

So here’s where you come in. If we’re going to add a layer of data to each player on the map, the question becomes – what *kind* of data? And how should we visualize it? My initial thoughts on types of data hew somewhat to my post on the Database of Intentions, so that would include:

- Purchase Data (including credit card info)

- Search Data (query, path taken, history)

- Social Graph Data (identity, friend data)

- Interest Data (Likes, tweets, recommendations, links)

- Location Data (ambient as well as declared/checked in)

- Content Data (Journey through content, likes, engagement, “behavioral”)

Those are some of the big buckets. Clearly, we can debate if, for example, identity should be its own category, separate from social, etc, and that’s exactly the kind of argument I hope to spark. I’m sure I’ve missed huge swaths of landscape, but I’m writing this in a rush (have a meeting in five minutes!) and wanted to get the engine started, so to speak.

I’m gathering a small group of industry folks at my home in the next week to further this debate, but I most certainly want to invite my closest collaborators – readers here at Searchblog, to help us out as we build the next version of the map. Which, by the way, will be open sourced and ready for hacking….

So please dive into comments and tell me, what are the key categories of data that companies are looking to control?