OK, AOL Didn’t Quite Work Out, But..

…maybe we can save our publishing butts with Kosmix. In 1998 Google founder Sergey Brin offered fellow Stanford University PhD students Anand Rajarman and Venky Harinarayan the chance to buy Google for $1m (£675,000). They said no. A year later, with Amazon's backing, Mr Rajarmand and Mr Harinarayan offered…

maybe we can save our publishing butts with Kosmix.

In 1998 Google founder Sergey Brin offered fellow Stanford University PhD students Anand Rajarman and Venky Harinarayan the chance to buy Google for $1m (£675,000). They said no.

A year later, with Amazon’s backing, Mr Rajarmand and Mr Harinarayan offered $300m. But Mr Brin, and Google co-founders Larry Page, refused to accept less than $1bn.

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Google Down Year to Year, Part Two

The meme is growing Internet search, which has so far served as a dependable source of growth for online advertising, could possibly see its first-ever sequential decline in the first quarter of next year, according to a Wall Street analyst. That in turn will be a likely drag on…

The meme is growing

Internet search, which has so far served as a dependable source of growth for online advertising, could possibly see its first-ever sequential decline in the first quarter of next year, according to a Wall Street analyst.

That in turn will be a likely drag on Google Inc.’s revenue, Citigroup analyst Mark Mahaney said in a note to clients Monday.

Mahaney said that he’s sensing “nervousness” about the first quarter of next year, which could mark “the first negative sequential growth quarter ever for search.”
.

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An Interview With @comcastcares

Perhaps the best example of a company leveraging new media to turn nasty customer complaints into happy customer evangelists is Comcast. Yes, you read that right, Comcast. This nifty piece of conversational jujitsu has been accomplished in large part by Frank Eliason, better known by his handle @comcastcares on…

Comcastcares Pic

Perhaps the best example of a company leveraging new media to turn nasty customer complaints into happy customer evangelists is Comcast. Yes, you read that right, Comcast. This nifty piece of conversational jujitsu has been accomplished in large part by Frank Eliason, better known by his handle @comcastcares on Twitter.

I’ve been following Frank’s work on Twitter for a while, it seemed he was always listening to what folks were saying, and when folks (inevitably) ranted about Comcast service, he jumped in, and almost always seemed to fix the problem. Then it happened to me, in October, my service started acting deeply flaky, and I complained about it.



I quickly got a response, and when I moved to a new place last month, he helped again. Then just this weekend, my new Internet service started acting flaky again, and in ten minutes, Frank had assessed the problem and helped me fix it, calmly, intelligently, and in the grammar natural to social media.

I wanted to learn more about Frank and Comcast’s efforts in this area, so I emailed him and asked if he’d do an interview. Below is the result. Thanks Frank!

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I Want Shoes That Look Like THIS – I Plan to Link to New Search Tools Again

I've decided to start linking to new stuff in search that gets sent to me again, but be forewarned – I won't be able to give it a full grokking. That said, a lot of new stuff has landed in my inbox, and it always bums me out to…

Shoe Search

I’ve decided to start linking to new stuff in search that gets sent to me again, but be forewarned – I won’t be able to give it a full grokking. That said, a lot of new stuff has landed in my inbox, and it always bums me out to have to say “sorry guys I don’t have time.” So from now on, if something catches my eye, I’m going to link to it and give a (very) brief overview. If anyone out there wants to send me stuff, go right ahead, and know that whatever you mail to me I may borrow from to describe whatever it is you’ve built.

First up is Modista. It comes from Berkeley (GO BEARS) so perhaps that’s what tipped it for me. From the email:

We are two computer science Ph.D. students at UC Berkeley, and we’d like to tell you about our project.

Modista applies visual search to online shopping, but it’s very different from Like.com. We use the technology to enable product discovery, so users can browse huge inventories quickly and effectively. It fundamentally changes the user experience: rather than navigating text-based menus and scrolling through lists of results, you can simply rely on your visual intuition.

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GOOG’s A Steal Sez Analyst: Q4 Insight From Redacted Blog Post?

A price target of 450! Wow, that's like way above where it is now. Wait, where are we, in 2004?! Check this note from UBS (can't link, bc banks are so 1991): * Google highlights paid click growth and e-commerce activity A recent post on the official Google Retail…

A price target of 450! Wow, that’s like way above where it is now. Wait, where are we, in 2004?! Check this note from UBS (can’t link, bc banks are so 1991):

* Google highlights paid click growth and e-commerce activity

A recent post on the official Google Retail blog referenced some encouraging e-Commerce/paid click trends for the Black Friday through Cyber Monday period, both in terms of broader e-Commerce (cited from comScore) but also GOOG’s internally-tracked paid click growth for Cyber Monday in several key retail categories, many of which were up double-digits vs. the year ago period.

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Yahoo Search Insight

Good insight from RWW on Yahoo Search plans: Next year, Yahoo will introduce new technology to augment their Yahoo Search results: abstracts of key information alongside URLs. Instead of just offering a list of links, Yahoo's search results will include machine-extracted information that is relevant to the URL returned….

Good insight from RWW on Yahoo Search plans:

Next year, Yahoo will introduce new technology to augment their Yahoo Search results: abstracts of key information alongside URLs. Instead of just offering a list of links, Yahoo’s search results will include machine-extracted information that is relevant to the URL returned. Sound familiar? The technology is very much like SearchMonkey, except for one thing: this time the technology is being built in-house and not by independent third-party developers.

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Reader RupertG Writes…

Reader RupertG writes: I'm not sure that there's a huge great wobbly lump of wondermoney sitting at the end of the real-time web search rainbow…

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Reader RupertG writes: I’m not sure that there’s a huge great wobbly lump of wondermoney

sitting at the end of the real-time web search rainbow
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Well, That Says It All

From American Lawyer: Google Inc. and Yahoo! Inc. called off their joint advertising agreement just three hours before the Department of Justice planned to file antitrust charges to block the pact, according to the lawyer who would have been lead counsel for the government….

From American Lawyer:

Google Inc. and Yahoo! Inc. called off their joint advertising agreement just three hours before the Department of Justice planned to file antitrust charges to block the pact, according to the lawyer who would have been lead counsel for the government.

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