I See A Trend Here…

Headlines pulled from today's issue of I Want Media: The Quest to Bring Consumers to the Advertising Technological advances are helping create a fear among ad execs that conventional advertising is losing its punch. The best advertising should be "a form of entertainment or even a part of everyday…

Headlines pulled from today’s issue of I Want Media:

The Quest to Bring Consumers to the Advertising

Technological advances are helping create a fear among ad execs that conventional advertising is losing its punch. The best advertising should be “a form of entertainment or even a part of everyday life.”

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Google a One Hit Wonder, Muses Ballmer

Bizweek reports: Speaking to a packed auditorium at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif., on May 12, Ballmer trumpeted the ripe opportunities around Microsoft's sprawling business and questioned the ability of Google (GOOG ) to maintain its edge. Clearly alluding to Microsoft's key Internet search rival, Ballmer said: "The…

Ibm XtBizweek reports:

Speaking to a packed auditorium at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif., on May 12, Ballmer trumpeted the ripe opportunities around Microsoft’s sprawling business and questioned the ability of Google (GOOG ) to maintain its edge. Clearly alluding to Microsoft’s key Internet search rival, Ballmer said: “The hottest company right now — the one nobody thinks can do any wrong — may just be a one-hit wonder.”

Yeah, and where was Microsoft seven years after it was founded? Let’s see, it started in 1975, so that’d be 1982. By then, MSFT had one major product categories: DOS. Sure, it also had programming languages and some false starts in hardware and games (kind of like Google has OEM deals, the Search Appliance and Orkut), but it was, for the most part, a one trick pony. Its revenues of about $24 million in 1982 pale compare to Google’s $5 billion+ run rate at year seven.

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Updata

That was the name of the odds & ends (and corrections) column we had at Wired in the early days. It was too clever for its own good. Here's some odds & ends in the search world: Via its desktop search, Google does deal with Lotus to search Notes….

That was the name of the odds & ends (and corrections) column we had at Wired in the early days. It was too clever for its own good. Here’s some odds & ends in the search world:

Via its desktop search, Google does deal with Lotus to search Notes. In fact, Google has launched Google Desktop Search for Enterprise, with various enterprise friendly features (ie, the damn thing was not going to fly as is in companies concerned about security). Take note, enterprise, Google has not forsaken you.

Danny finds evidence of Google doing….old fashioned marketing. In Kansas City, no less. What’s wrong with Peoria?

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Another Googler Pulls Up Steaks (er, Stakes)…

…this time in the kitchen. Google chef Charlie Ayers is cashing in his chips. Now, let's review: last week it was Wayne Rosing, before that it was Cindy McAffrey, before than, Evan Williams. I am sure I am missing some. The lure of having enough money to do your…

…this time in the kitchen. Google chef Charlie Ayers is cashing in his chips. Now, let’s review: last week it was Wayne Rosing, before that it was Cindy McAffrey, before than, Evan Williams. I am sure I am missing some. The lure of having enough money to do your own thing is very real…

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Furl Opens Up To Publishers

No sooner did I request the Times make Times File more "Furl like" does Furl announce that it is opening up a private label version for publishers. Cool….

FurlNo sooner did I request the Times make Times File more “Furl like” does Furl announce that it is opening up a private label version for publishers. Cool.

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NYT Goes Sub For Portions of Site

By now most of you have read that the Times is putting its Op Ed contributors behind a paid sub wall. (Caveat: I did a very brief consulting gig for the Times back in the Fall on these issues writ large). Fifty bucks will get you "TimesSelect" – all…

Nyt-1By now most of you have read that the Times is putting its Op Ed contributors behind a paid sub wall. (Caveat: I did a very brief consulting gig for the Times back in the Fall on these issues writ large).

Fifty bucks will get you “TimesSelect” – all the Op Ed columnists, plus the entire Times archive, plus some other bells and whistles like the Times email news alerts, some organizational tools, and some special editorial features. Times coverage is here. The release is here.

It’s tough to make what was once free into a paid business, and the Times is getting some to-be-expected shit for this. But I think I understand where they are coming from on this one. They are keeping most of the site free, after all, and asking that people pay for the stuff that has proven to be the most valuable – folks’ opinions.

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Google and the Long Tail

Chris Anderson has a nice write up of Eric Schmidt's talk at the shareholder meeting, including and explanation of the the graph at left. Update: Here's the link. Sorry folks, had some odd posting issues….

Googlelt2 2Chris Anderson has a nice write up of Eric Schmidt’s talk at the shareholder meeting, including and explanation of the the graph at left.

Update: Here’s the link. Sorry folks, had some odd posting issues.

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Seth On Arbitrage

It's going to be a five part series this week, here's part one. From it: The largest beneficiary of online arbitrage is Google, which continues to leverage the basic behavior of people searching for things to drive ever more valuable commercial services; in fact, each Google application which leverages…

It’s going to be a five part series this week, here’s part one.

From it:

The largest beneficiary of online arbitrage is Google, which continues to leverage the basic behavior of people searching for things to drive ever more valuable commercial services; in fact, each Google application which leverages their core algorithmic platform effectively buys low and sells hi. This is probably why Google refuses to disclose much to investors, or why it provides far less information to advertisers than virtually any other online media network. Google does not want anybody to know how it arbs search behavior for increasing returns.

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