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Once Again, RSS Is Dead. But ONLY YOU Can Save It!

By - January 25, 2012

About 14 months ago, I responded to myriad “RSS is Dead” stories by asking you, my RSS readers, if you were really reading. At that point, Google’s Feedburner service was telling me I had more than 200,000 subscribers, but it didn’t feel like the lights were on – I mean, that’s a lot of people, but my pageviews were low, and with RSS, it’s really hard to know if folks are reading you, because the engagement happens on the reader, not here on the site. (That’s always been the problem publishers have had with RSS – it’s impossible to monetize. I mean, think about it. Dick Costolo went to Twitter after he sold Feedburner to Google. Twitter! And this was *before* it had a business model. Apparently that was far easier to monetize than RSS).

Now, I made the decision long ago to let my “full feed” go into RSS, and hence, I don’t get to sell high-value ads to those of you who are RSS readers. (I figure the tradeoff is worth it – my main goal is to get you hooked on my addiction to parentheses, among other things.)

Anyway, to test my theory that my RSS feed was Potemkin in nature, I wrote a December, 2010 post asking RSS readers to click through and post a comment if they were, in fact, reading me via RSS. Overwhelmingly they responded “YES!” That post still ranks in the top ten of any post, ever, in terms of number of comments plus tweets – nearly 200.

Now, put another way this result was kind of pathetic – less than one in 1000 of my subscribers answered the call. Perhaps I should have concluded that you guys are either really lazy, secretly hate me, or in fact, really aren’t reading. Instead, I decided to conclude that for every one of you that took the time to comment or Tweet, hundreds of you were nodding along in agreement. See how writers convince themselves of their value?

Which is a long way to say, it’s time for our nearly-yearly checkup. And this time, I’m going to give you more data to work with, and a fresh challenge. (Or a pathetic entreaty, depending on your point of view.)

Ok, so here’s what has happened in 14 months: My RSS feed has almost doubled – it now sports nearly 400,000 subscribers, which is g*dd*am impressive, no? I mean, who has FOUR HUNDRED THOUSAND people who’ve raised their hands and asked to join your club? I’ve WON, no? Time for gold-plated teeth or somesh*t, right?

Well, no.

While it’s true that nearly 400,000 of you have elected to follow my RSS feed, the grim truth is more aptly told by what Google’s Feedburner service calls my “Reach.” By their definition, reach means “the total number of people who have taken action — viewed or clicked — on the content in your feed.”

And that number, as you can see, is pathetic. I mean, “click,” I can understand. Why click when you can read the full article in your reader? But “view”?! Wait, lemme do some math here….OK, one in 594 of you RSS readers are even reading my stuff. That’s better than the one in 1000 who answered the call last time, but wow, it’s way worse than I thought. Just *reading* doesn’t require you click through, or tweet something, or leave a comment.

Either RSS is pretty moribund, or, I must say, I am deeply offended.

What I really want to know is this: Am I normal? Is it normal for sites like mine to have .0017 percent of its RSS readers actually, well, be readers?

Or is the latest in a very long series of posts (a decade now, trust me) really right this time  - RSS is well and truly dead?

Here’s my test for you. If I get more comments and tweets on this post than I have “reach” by Google Feedburner status, well, that’s enough for me to pronounce RSS Alive and Well (by my own metric of nodding along, of course). If it’s less than 664, I’m sorry, RSS is Well And Truly Dead. And it’s all your fault.

(PS, that doesn’t mean I’ll stop using it. Ever. Insert Old Man Joke Here.)

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573 thoughts on “Once Again, RSS Is Dead. But ONLY YOU Can Save It!

  1. Louis Gray says:

    I read your post. Now you have to guess whether I saw it via Google Reader or Google+.

  2. Jana jaajajA says:

    Reading on rss mobile

  3. Michael Davidson says:

    Is this just a ploy to get me to look at ads?

    Saw this on your RSS feed, of course.

  4. Gil Tayar says:

    Reading through Google Reader. For the record, I read most of your posts

  5. Lionfire says:

    I’ll chime in on behalf of all those who do most of their feed reading offline. I’m personally very grateful to any author gracious enough to offer full-feed posts that I can take with me when I’m on the move with limited bandwidth.

    If there was a way to monetise that without introducing frustrating micropayments, I’d be all for it.

  6. Michael Davidson says:

    Is this just a ploy to get me to look at ads?

    Saw this on your RSS feed, of course.

  7. Lionfire says:

    I’ll chime in on behalf of all those who do most of their feed reading offline. I’m personally very grateful to any author gracious enough to offer full-feed posts that I can take with me when I’m on the move with limited bandwidth.

    If there was a way to monetise that without introducing frustrating micropayments, I’d be all for it.

  8. Anon says:

    reading rss, of course… RSS is alive and well.

  9. Reader says:

    Read in Google Reader

  10. So of course I read this and other RSS feeds. The thing is, Google Reader allows you to read the whole post without having to click through.

  11. Guest says:

    For some reason this post reminded me of this…
    “Ere, he says he’s not dead.”
    “Yes he is.”
    “I’m not.”

  12. Recurse around the rosy says:

    Meep meep.

    Read most of your articles on an iPad.

  13. Recurse around the rosy says:

    Meep meep.

    Read most of your articles on an iPad.

  14. MJ in Michigan says:

    A Google Reader reader here – and I read most of your posts that way. 

  15. Spencer says:

    Google Reader reader.

  16. kb says:

    Another google reader…

  17. MXC says:

    GReader :). 

  18. Tuta says:

    I read your blog on Mixtab

  19. Octavian Costache says:

    I read you through Google Reader.

  20. Sam Zurcher says:

    reading with google reader.

  21. Rodneycruise says:

    Always read on google reader. Rss is my staple way of getting news. Not dead for me at all

  22. Jon says:

    You keep RSS alive! I fear change!

  23. Jon says:

    You keep RSS alive! I fear change! (NetNewsWire on the desktop, I’m old skool)

  24. Alexis Kefalas says:

    There is now way I could follow all the sites I want to follow, without the help of RSS… 

    I generally avoid non-full feeds. However, IF the writer is worth it, and IF the non-full feed is both engaging AND more than a couple of sentences, then I’ll gladly click…Also, a good discussion in the comments sections is what makes me usually click through to the article..

  25. Jonathan Young says:

    You keep RSS alive! I fear change! (NetNewsWire on the desktop, I’m old skool) [and apparently unable to comment as guest - curse you federated logins!]

  26. Matt says:

    I’m reading! (on google reader)

  27. RSS is alive and well. At least among tech-savy folks who matter. Hopefully.

  28. Matt says:

    I’m reading! (on google reader)

  29. Jwmathijssen says:

    Rss > google reader > flipboard: i read your blog as if it’s a magazine

  30. maheshcr says:

    Coming in via Google Reader

  31. Piotr says:

    Not dead yet.

  32. colinwalker says:

    RSS certainly isn’t dead John, at least not for me. While I can follow links from G+ or Twitter being in the UK and suffering the curse of a different time zone I miss a lot of the good stuff. RSS is vital in keeping up with it.

  33. Benedict says:

    Here via Google Reader – which is where I read practically everything on the web.

  34. Deirdre says:

    I love RSS! (Reading you via NewsFox, a Firefox plug-in.)

  35. Dan Rabin says:

    I read every one of your articles via RSS on Google Reader.

  36. Cdelrosso says:

    using google reader

  37. Cdelrosso says:

    using google reader

  38. Erik says:

    I subscribed because this blog was part of Google bundle (bundle’s name is Chris Anderson). Rarely read it but I read RSS feeds quite a lot… Also, instead of declaring RSS in general dead you can try to make it more interesting :-)

    • Anonymous says:

      Huh I a bundle? Never heard of it….and with the current editor of Wired? Or curator of TED?
      Sent from my crippled apple device

  39. peter cowan says:

    read it.

  40. Erik says:

    I subscribed because this blog was part of Google bundle (bundle’s name is Chris Anderson). Rarely read it but I read RSS feeds quite a lot… Also, instead of declaring RSS in general dead you can try to make it more interesting :-)

  41. Andy Jukes says:

    I’m here. I’m a RSS subscriber. Must have missed (or dismissed) that first call-out for RSS love.

  42. Vegard Ryan says:

    Its Alive!

  43. Nick says:

    Google Reader

  44. Foo says:

    Requiring a login to post is usually too high a bar for me and my fellow nodders.

  45. Zandro says:

    Actually I never got it, why I should follow for example a news site on a social network to flood my stream and scatter the discussions to different places when I can have them as a structured, filterable RSS feed

    But I’m a little bit concerned about Google Reader, when you need an extension to Google Chrome just to be able to subscribe to RSS feeds, wtf?

  46. Joe says:

    I read via the Sage reader in Firefox.

    PS: my blog also started on 20 October 2003.

  47. Zandro says:

    Actually I never got it, why I should follow for example a news site on a social network to flood my stream and scatter the discussions to different places when I can have them as a structured, filterable RSS feed

    But I’m a little bit concerned about Google Reader, when you need an extension to Google Chrome just to be able to subscribe to RSS feeds, wtf?

  48. Jay Solomon says:

    RSS Reader – Feed Demon, I always read the full article!

  49. Ez says:

    RSS reader here!

  50. D. Mark says:

    Google Reader !

  51. Thomas says:

    I read your posts using RSS. Thanks for giving us the full versions!

  52. Yensid82 says:

    Google Reader !

  53. erik b says:

    Google Reader user chiming in here: I’m not an avid fan, but I notice and read your posts occasionally!

  54. Erik Brunar says:

    Google Reader user chiming in here: I’m not an avid fan, but I notice and read your posts occasionally!

  55. Emily Wood says:

    Read this via Google Reader.  According to my Reader stats & trends, I’ve read 83% of your posts in the past 30 days.
    (And I AM hooked on your addiction to parenthesis.  Does that make us co-dependent enablers?!) 

  56. dano says:

    RSS is how I enjoy all of your insightful repartee.

  57. Email says:

    read it in google reader!

  58. Usually thru Google Reader, occasionally via Twitter.

  59. This one feed reader is alive and well. Reading every word of everything you write, and spreading it on Twitter and Facebook when it’s excellent.

  60. Will Scott says:

    I follow along pretty regularly through google reader.  RSS is amazing from a consumer perspective, since you get a consistant, centralized, and relatively low-ad way to consume everything.
    I started using reader about 6 years ago, when I realized I was wasting too much time browsing the web.  It remains a great way to cap my web time, because when there isn’t anything in my subscribed feeds I know I’m done.

  61. Daviddhall says:

    Reader sucka

  62. Anonymous says:

    Read it.
    Nice call to action, albeit longer than most will read.

  63. Hfo says:

    Long live RSS

  64. Hfo says:

    Long live RSS

  65. Espenk65 says:

    Read it through Google Reader, as I do with a lot of other feeds. Good stuff, keep it coming!

  66. Duncan Booth says:

    The point of something like Google Reader is that I can read the articles that are of interest and very quickly skip over the ones that aren’t. There are 3 levels of interest: 1) read the headline, boooringgg, skip to next article. 2) Read headline plus whatever is in the feed, 3) Read the headline and click through to see the article in all it’s glory.

    Almost everything I see in Reader will come under categories 1 or 2. An ‘is RSS really dead’ post is almost certainly #1, whereas your real posts are worth reading.

    Should you include the full text in your RSS feed? That’s up to you, but I rarely click through to articles from feeds that do title+snippet, so you are getting a lot more exposure to your readers by including that text than just including snippets.

    One way you might get more click-through is to value-add your posts. One blog I follow makes good use of fonts with the result that while the RSS has the text it loses readability, so in that case I always click through (but that’s still only assuming the topic looks interesting).

  67. Jgre says:

    Long live RSS

  68. “…my main goal is to get you hooked on my addiction to parentheses…” – I had to stop using Twitter b/c of your posts. They are literally too addicting. I was/am too unproductive in other endeavors (life) when I read this stuff. I think it’s safe to say you can check your main goal off the list. 

  69. Adrian Cuthbert says:

    Read in Google Reader and now I see the page for the first time

  70. Antonsalex says:

    I scan my RSS daily and read only what catches my eye

  71. Nam says:

    Yes, reading through google reeder, albeit passively!

  72. Stefan says:

    ohhh, please never stop feeding!!!

  73. Skyhigh says:

    *ping* – had to make a special trip online to post this! ;)

  74. Andy Baio says:

    Hey, John! Greetings from ye olde Google Reader. Still reading, after all these years, even if I never comment. :)

  75. Ivoszz Ivoszz says:

    google reader, but when I read the article I always open it in separeta tab. 

  76. Ivoszz Ivoszz says:

    google reader, but when I read the article I always open it in separeta tab. 

  77. Paul says:

    google reader on the subway in vienna!

  78. Gareth says:

    Another Google reader user…

  79. Tomasvdb says:

    clicked through from Opera feed reader, but the link to the article is very hard to see (faded grey on a white background). Ive been reading your feed for years, but probably only clicked through to the site a handful of times. I do click through more on feeds that do not provide the full article in the feed. 

  80. Vinzouille says:

    Rss reader here

  81. Vinzouille says:

    Google reader here.

  82. Vinzouille says:

    Google reader here in Paris. Leaving a comment despite Disqus’ inability to let me post as a guesst.
    Edit: or maybe the error message was … an error. Sorry for the triple post

  83. Anon says:

     I read this post in Google Reader – the only way I read this (or almost any other) blog.

  84. Jon Stacey says:

    RSS reader touching base…….keep it up

  85. Apurv Anand says:

    One more from Google Reader

  86. Phil says:

    Tweet tweet. Still feed and read RSS elsewhere, though.

  87. Apurv Anand says:

    One more from Google Reader

  88. Phil says:

    Tweet tweet. Still feed and read RSS elsewhere, though.

  89. Services says:

    google reader!

  90. Henrik Holen says:

    Google reader – RSS is alive and well!

  91. Clement Mazen says:

    Netvibes user here, found this article there
    I normally don’t read any articles within Netvibes – I click on the headline if it grabs my attention.

  92. Arthur M. Santos says:

    Another Google Reader user, from Brazil. Maybe we’re like most of the Linux desktop users: we just show up when people say we have less than 1% of market share.

  93. Pat McCarthy says:

    Google Reader…Been reading you via RSS from just about the start John. But, the reality is that normal people don’t use RSS, and even with your large numbers a lot of those are people who sign up for a feed reader and end up ditching it. I’m sure some services have you as a recommended or auto-subscribed feed to get people started.

  94. Pat McCarthy says:

    Google Reader…Been reading you via RSS from just about the start John. But, the reality is that normal people don’t use RSS, and even with your large numbers a lot of those are people who sign up for a feed reader and end up ditching it. I’m sure some services have you as a recommended or auto-subscribed feed to get people started.

  95. Arkanosis says:

    Reading your blog through Google Reader :-)

  96. Sam says:

    you write for the web; in Google Reader, there’s no link back to your article at the bottom; I have to scroll back up to the top… 

  97. Sam says:

    you write for the web; in Google Reader, there’s no link back to your article at the bottom; I have to scroll back up to the top… 

  98. tacanderson says:

    I’m no John Battelle or anything but I have 1,629 hard won subscribers and a reach of 195, which puts me in at 11%. I imagine the more subscribers you have though, it’s normal to have lower number of reach. I’d also argue that the more you post (you do post quite a bit) the lower your per-post reach will be (assuming that’s what reach is measuring).  

    And as far as are you normal? I would think the Founder/Chairman of Federated Media could check against your publishers and come back to us with that answer :)  

  99. tacanderson says:

    I’m no John Battelle or anything but I have 1,629 hard won subscribers and a reach of 195, which puts me in at 11%. I imagine the more subscribers you have though, it’s normal to have lower number of reach. I’d also argue that the more you post (you do post quite a bit) the lower your per-post reach will be (assuming that’s what reach is measuring).  

    And as far as are you normal? I would think the Founder/Chairman of Federated Media could check against your publishers and come back to us with that answer :)  

  100. DigiSkip says:

    RSS all the way!!! (ps – happy Australia Day)

  101. Guest says:

    Reading you on Google Reader, and sufficiently provoked by the premise (and the statistics) to reply.

    One reason your readership statistics might be low is that people using RSS feeds are seeking information in an EFFICIENT way. I suspect that means that many of them probably also use browser extensions such as AdBlock Plus, Ghostery, NoScript or CookieMonster to reduce the amount of garbage they have to download in order to read information. Any and all of those extensions could make it difficult or impossible for GoogleAnalytics and the like to track whether your posts are being read. Readership statistics do not equal readership!

    Your response levels might be low because people have to take several actions to respond: it’s not as simple as just clicking “reply” or comment, as the RSS feeder just shows the article, not the comments or commenting tools. To get this far, I’ve had to first click on the headline to open the post on your site in a new tab, then accept scripts from Battellemedia.com to get the Disqus “Add new comment” box to appear. By the time I get it to post, I may have had to accept cookies and scripts from half a dozen other places, which is not efficient….

  102. Guest says:

    Reading you on Google Reader, and sufficiently provoked by the premise (and the statistics) to reply.

    One reason your readership statistics might be low is that people using
    RSS feeds are seeking information in an EFFICIENT way. I suspect that
    means that many of them probably also use browser extensions such as
    AdBlock Plus, Ghostery, NoScript or CookieMonster to reduce the amount
    of garbage they have to download in order to read information. Any and
    all of those extensions could make it difficult or impossible for
    GoogleAnalytics and the like to track whether your posts are being read. Readership statistics do not equal readership!

    Your response levels might be low because people have to take several
    actions to respond: it’s not as simple as just clicking “reply” or
    comment, as the RSS feeder just shows the article, not the comments or
    commenting tools. To get this far, I’ve had to first click on the
    headline to open the post on your site in a new tab, then accept scripts and cookies from Battellemedia.com to get the Disqus “Add new comment” box to
    appear. By the time I get it to post, I may have had to accept cookies
    and scripts from half a dozen other places, which is not efficient….

  103. Guest says:

    Reading you on Google Reader, and sufficiently provoked by the premise (and the statistics) to reply.

    One reason your readership statistics might be low is that people using
    RSS feeds are seeking information in an EFFICIENT way. I suspect that
    means that many of them probably also use browser extensions such as
    AdBlock Plus, Ghostery, NoScript or CookieMonster to reduce the amount
    of garbage they have to download in order to read information. Any and
    all of those extensions could make it difficult or impossible for
    GoogleAnalytics and the like to track whether your posts are being read. Readership statistics do not equal readership!

    Your response levels might be low because people have to take several
    actions to respond: it’s not as simple as just clicking “reply” or
    comment, as the RSS feeder just shows the article, not the comments or
    commenting tools. To get this far, I’ve had to first click on the
    headline to open the post on your site in a new tab, then accept scripts
    and cookies from Battellemedia.com to get the Disqus “Add new comment”
    box to
    appear. By the time I get it to post, I may have had to accept cookies
    and scripts from half a dozen other places, which is not efficient….

  104. Guest says:

    Reading you on Google Reader, and sufficiently provoked by the premise (and the statistics) to reply.

    One reason your readership statistics might be low is that people using
    RSS feeds are seeking information in an EFFICIENT way. I suspect that
    means that many of them probably also use browser extensions such as
    AdBlock Plus, Ghostery, NoScript or CookieMonster to reduce the amount
    of garbage they have to download in order to read information. Any and
    all of those extensions could make it difficult or impossible for
    GoogleAnalytics and the like to track whether your posts are being read. Readership statistics do not equal readership!

    Your response levels might be low because people have to take several
    actions to respond: it’s not as simple as just clicking “reply” or
    comment, as the RSS feeder just shows the article, not the comments or
    commenting tools. To get this far, I’ve had to first click on the
    headline to open the post on your site in a new tab, then accept scripts
    and cookies from Battellemedia.com and a bunch of other sites to get the “Add new comment”
    box to
    appear and accept my post. Needless to say, this will be my last comment on the site (until next year’s survey, perhaps).

  105. Guest says:

    “Guest” posted three times the same comment because the comments system offered no feedback to show that my posting had been accepted until I had accepted scripts and cookies from a bunch of completely unrelated sites. So don’t forget to reduce your total number of readers by two. ;-)

  106. Jhmroes says:

    RSS is not dead, I regularly read your posts – in my reader, and I’m just not much of a commenter.

  107. Clive says:

    I’m reading you loud ‘n clear on feedly – and grateful for the full feed.

  108. Dorri732 says:

    Reading on RSS.

  109. RSS might be dead in the way you mean it to be, but I will argue that the people who use RSS are mavens that show their friends what it awesome on the internet.  We are the people who actively look for good content to share.  So those 664 in your reach are worth more than you might think.

  110. Dorri732 says:

    Reading on RSS.

  111. jt says:

    Hey John,
    Add me to the list of people who regularly read your blog via Google Reader, and I appreciate you posting the full feed via RSS.
    Thanks,
    jt

  112. Sines82 says:

    I’m reading from small European country via GReader.

  113. Artur Cabarrao says:

    RSSing daily… :)

  114. ct says:

    Something is screwy in the measurement methodology. Don’t sweat it. Google Reader lives.

  115. Would be really sneaky if you could add a post to your feed that didn’t appear in any other place. Then you’d know that responders really were reading the feed and not clicking on the link in the tweet.

    Anyway, +1 for RSS – it’s web-friendly. Please don’t restrict your content to a walled garden, however big.

  116. Asmiov says:

    Reading via Google Reader. And I really appreciate the fact we can get the full feed. 

  117. appreciate says:

    Google reader on the nexus

  118. I read this through Google Reader. Given that the full text is in the feed, I don’t click through to your blog, but given that Google Reader keeps track of what I read, it should be able to report this fact to you.

    Curious that you would need to make it more complicated for readers in order to drive up your “reach” – I, for one, would be less likely to read your posts is the full text were not available on RSS, since I then would have to make the decision to click through.

    Anyway – keep up the good work, your blog is highly readable and very informative.

  119. Dan Kershaw says:

    Reading on FeedDemon (the best RSS Reader Desktop Client) 
    RSS is not dead!

  120. Andrea Nicosia says:

    Read on Google Reader

  121. I read your RSS feed via email – FeedMyInbox. I read probably 99% of your posts via RSS. No real need for me to click through to the web site.

  122. I read your RSS feed via email – FeedMyInbox. I read probably 99% of your posts via RSS. No real need for me to click through to the web site.

  123. Tim Howland says:

    greader here, and I don’t trust the reach #s- seems like they are closer to banner ad clickthroughs than anything else.

  124. I read your RSS feed via email – FeedMyInbox. I read probably 99% of your posts via RSS. No real need for me to click through to the web site.

  125. Ken Evoy says:

    I never miss your stuff, John. It’s some of the most insightful thinking that keeps me thinking. It’s the first time I’ve commented, though, something I admit shamefully. 

  126. Roger S says:

    I always read via Google reader and rarely click through. RSS is invaluable to keep on top of blogs.

  127. GL says:

    Oh no, please don’t cut RSS – I read you! Ever thought how many articles are read in a newspaper? I’d say I read maybe one out of 100. I guess the same is true for my RSS reeder.

  128. Matt says:

    I read … and don’t trust Feedburner’s engagement statistics. I can’t prove it, but small scale tests we’ve done didn’t accurately record “reads” from desktop RSS viewers (e.g. NetNewsWire, Reeder)  and Google Reader was hit or miss.

  129. Matt says:

    Yes, I’m reading. When we tested FeedBurner statistics, we convinced ourselves it doesn’t accurately capture reads. Especially from third party readers. Hit or miss from Google Reader.

  130. evancparker says:

    Um, disqus doesnt like my mobile phone (android, HTC incredible). Damn near impossible to get the keyboard to appear when I touch-in to the comment field — which makes digital head nodding very difficult.

    Ps. Read every day, via rss, via mobile.

  131. Anonymous says:

    Yes, I’m reading. When we tested FeedBurner statistics, we convinced ourselves it doesn’t accurately capture reads. Especially from third party readers. Hit or miss from Google Reader.

  132. flaminglacer says:

    Read every post in my Reader :)

  133. evancparker says:

    Um, disqus doesnt like my mobile phone (android, HTC incredible). Damn near impossible to get the keyboard to appear when I touch-in to the comment field — which makes digital head nodding very difficult.

    Ps. Read every day, via rss, via mobile.

    • evancparker says:

      Pps.  Got “system errors” trying to comment via phone, three or four time.  Finally had to give up and find an actual computer to post.  Took 12 minutes total, and (sadly) very few of my thoughts are worthy of that kind of effort to share…

  134. Matt Anderson says:

    Yes, I’m reading. When we tested FeedBurner statistics, we convinced ourselves it doesn’t accurately capture reads. Especially from third party readers. Hit or miss from Google Reader.

  135. Michaela Barnes says:

    I read it. I often share it (more email than tweets). I even share my RSS feed list with other addicted users. I love the speed RSS allows me, to plow through over 100 items quickly and stay on top of things. How humanly would someone do that without a feedreader (I mean, and have a job and a life)? Thank you for both the column and the RSS lifeline.

  136. I subscribe to your feed but don’t see every post (not that I don’t want to).

    This post I found because you commented on Pirillo’s post on G+. 

    RSS is important. Without it, I’d never found you, seen an interview, bought your book, or even know your name. It’s the infastructure, like the I-beams that hold up a skyscraper.. working everyday mostly unnoticed.

    RSS readers suck, but they are the best we’ve got so far :)

  137. I subscribe to your feed but don’t see every post (not that I don’t want to).

    This post I found because you commented on Pirillo’s post on G+. 

    RSS is important. Without it, I’d never found you, seen an interview, bought your book, or even know your name. It’s the infrastructure, like the I-beams that hold up a skyscraper.. working everyday mostly unnoticed.

    RSS readers suck, but they are the best we’ve got so far :)

  138. Lelandjs says:

    Another RSS reader here. To be completely honest I never noticed that your feed went full-article; it’s become a habit to click through on any article if I like the first few sentences or so.

  139. Lelandjs says:

    Another RSS reader here. To be completely honest I never noticed that your feed went full-article; it’s become a habit to click through on any article if I like the first few sentences or so.

  140. Jeff says:

    Read every post in a reader, and rarely click through.

  141. Somewhat anonymous says:

    I read in a hybrid way using an RSS “reader” of my own construction to notify me of new posts, which I then read on your site directly.  I hate that I had to go set up a disposable email to post this, but I really wanted to answer your question.

  142. Definitely reading on RSS.

    Funny though, I wonder if the bunk FeedBurner statistics have anything to do with the fact that Google seems to not care much about its Reader product OR FeedBurner for that matter.

  143. Adam says:

    i read sometimes

  144. RSS Feed entusiast says:

    Absolutely in favour of RSS feeds.
    I wouldn’t be reading this page (and commenting) without RSS Feed.

  145. Thomas Traub says:

    RSS is well alive, it is my daily newspaper and principal source of news. 

    I regularly read Your posts in my reader. 

    Thanks for putting the complete articles into the feed, but I wouldn’t mind to have to click through to have it all – as long as Your site is fast. 

    You could include ads in Your feed, no ?I guess I prefer to have no ads in the feed with click through than the complete articles with ads.

  146. Secou says:

    I read your posts (here in France) directly through Google Reader… And well, as you state it… you’d a have better view of your reach if you put a short part of your posts in the RSS. RSS is not dead (I follow 300 feeds) !  But it’s not so “simple” for common users. They better understand Facebook’s page subscribing.

  147. Secou says:

    I read your posts (here in France) directly through Google Reader… And well, as you state it… you’d a have better view of your reach if you put a short part of your posts in the RSS. RSS is not dead (I follow 300 feeds) !  But it’s not so “simple” for common users. They better understand Facebook’s page subscribing.

  148. Secou says:

    I read your posts (here in France) directly through Google Reader… And well, as you state it… you’d a have better view of your reach if you put a short part of your posts in the RSS. RSS is not dead (I follow 300 feeds) !  But it’s not so “simple” for common users. They better understand Facebook’s page subscribing.

  149. Cap'n Ken says:

    I’ve got you in my RSS reader (NetNewsWire) and have for years, but this piece didn’t register with me as I went through my feeds this morning. But I noticed it when I happened to drop in to Google+, which I don’t do that often. I actually went back to see if this article was in your feed in my reader. It was. 

    So I still get the majority of my news (industry news, at least) from my RSS reader, and that’s how I usually read you. But the piece on whether anybody is out there in RSS land … I managed to pass over without noticing. 

  150. webwise says:

    Google Reader for me.  Without it, I’d miss reading many of the sources that help keep me informed.

  151. bob says:

    FWIW, Google Reader. Rarely click through. Even more rare to click through and click an ad. Hmm. If I don’t have a login that this will accept, you’ll have lost a comment.

  152. J D says:

    I read some of your posts through my reader but generally do not click through to the actual page.

  153. Jon Abad says:

    Rumors of RSS’s death are, as always, slightly exaggerated.

  154. Matt T. says:

    For me, if it’s not in an RSS reader, then its not news

  155. All in on RSS – I consume everything (including Twitter) through RSS.  It allows me to never miss a tweet or post from my favorite sources (including the Searchblog)!

  156. Adam says:

    Mostly view your posts on Google Reader and sometimes via Flipboard

  157. Anonymous says:

    Reading

  158. Guest says:

    I never come here, I read you on Google reader and that’s it. I don’t like tweeter and I will never re-tweet anything, that’s a bad indicator of success.

  159. Idoa01 says:

    one more from the silent RSS crowd

  160. prefabrik says:

    Interestingly, if you do a little research, key members of the stage6
    team (operating under the name ZenGarden) moved on to other things in
    late Jan/early Feb.Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/2008/2/youtube-kills-another-rival-divx-to-shut-down-stage6#ixzz1kZStrPPq

  161. Idoa01 says:

    one more from the silent RSS crowd

  162. John says:

    I’m definitely reading your blog and finding everything very insightful via Google Reader.

  163. Idoa01 says:

    one more from the silent RSS crowd

  164. yoyo says:

    Here is the thing, your post is too long and the call to action takes forever to show up. Try putting your last paragraph first and then illustrate by saying all the other things that appear on your post, most people won’t read them anyway. Best.

  165. Dan Thornton says:

    I subscribe to about 500 sites via RSS, including this one, despite the fact that Google has not only kneecapped the social features of Google Reader and failed to improve Feedburner in years, but GReader itself seems to be getting slower and slower…

    I also always include RSS options for people, not just for human readers and the search bots which also appear in Feedburner stats, but also for that massive Syndication element…

    Incidentally – I can’t remember if it was accurately fixed, but some microblogging services led to hugely inflated subscriber numbers on feedburner in the past…

  166. Dan Thornton says:

    Double post… apologies

  167. Dan Thornton says:

    Apologies for triple posting – Disqus hung on me…

  168. Scowei says:

    Always read in Google reader, never on your site.

  169. Jsbennett_law says:

    Reading faithfully via RSS.

  170. Jsbennett_law says:

    Reading faithfully via RSS.

  171. Jennifer says:

    Reading faithfully via RSS.

  172. Antoine says:

    I’ll add my voice to the silent crowd of RSS readers.

  173. Adam Reiter says:

    Another silent watcher…

  174. Dtdmsd says:

    I’m reading via RSS.  Not every article, but every headline – and clicking through the many an article along the way.

  175. Doug Barense says:

    Sorry I missed commenting on your post last year! I truly read your posts (or at least most of them).  Thank you for being providing your very insightful posts and being a great balance to some of the crap out there.

  176. Doug says:

    Sorry I missed commenting on your post last year! I truly read your posts (or at least most of them).  Thank you for being providing your very insightful posts and being a great balance to some of the crap out there.

    P.S.  Sorry for any duplicates – I’m having a hard time posting my comments.  My Disqus account isn’t being saved and posting as a Guest isn’t working either.

  177. Ncampos says:

    RSS rulez

  178. Ncampos says:

    RSS rulez

  179. David Siebenheller says:

    Present and accounted for…

  180. Count me as a careful reader via RSS and generally an RSS junkie. 

    Compare that to the miserable experience of going to the page, finding the type is way smaller than what my eyes want, and that the comment box is not showing because my security setting block whichever of the twelve (yes 12!) separate external sites are runnig scripts here.  RSS is for definately what I want.

  181. Count me as a careful reader via RSS and generally an RSS junkie. 

    Compare that to the miserable experience of going to the page, finding the type is way smaller than what my eyes want, and that the comment box is not showing because my security setting block whichever of the twelve (yes 12!) separate external sites are runnig scripts here.  RSS is for definately what I want.

  182. Diego Gomes says:

    I read every single post here. I use google reader and i didnt even know how this site looked like. I do not recall how i got your feed and i’m a really absent commenter. Sorry for that, but i’m still here.

  183. Diego Gomes says:

    I read every single post here. I use google reader and i didnt even know how this site looked like. I do not recall how i got your feed and i’m a really absent commenter. Sorry for that, but i’m still here.

  184. Steven Pierce says:

    RSS i’ll never quit you. as you were.

  185. Sid Sidner says:

    You, Seth Godin, and Doc Searls are the only advertising types I read regularly.  You even beat out Kara Swisher and her Boomtown viral video teasers.

    Feel the love, John.  You are the classic example of pull.

  186. Kevin Hillstrom says:

    Not dead … reading by RSS.  My reach numbers are about 1/4 of my blog subscribers, on average.

  187. Errol Mars says:

    I like RSS but when I look at the usage pattern of people I know, I think RSS is just to complex still for most people.

  188. Dan says:

    I’m reading your blog via RSS, too.

  189. Patrick Chen says:

    i took the headline bait, and rss is not dead :)

  190. John Borkowski says:

    I subscribe to a TON of RSS feeds. RSS is my main source of news. Twitter feed along side the news reader is kind of like the radio in the background… constantly scrolling.

    I see 100% of your headlines. When one interests me, I will read it in my reader (google). Every now and then I will click though on some articles. Like this one.

    Keys to my clicking through:

    A quality article or synopsis with the promise of more quality information. With the hundres of RSS feeds I read, I do not waste time on junk or duplications.

    Something that makes me happy or angry. Usually angry it sadly seems.  Then I will click through and comment on an article.  

  191. Kevin Hillstrom says:

    Not dead … reading by RSS.  My reach numbers are about 1/4 of my blog subscribers, on average.

  192. Egon says:

     I read your posts in my reader

  193. Daniel Jones says:

    Many read but don’t post or interact – like me.

  194. Daniel Jones says:

    Many read but don’t post or interact – like me.

  195. J Tandy says:

    Google Reader here.  I’ve tried putting things in my Facebook or Google+ streams, but I much prefer leaving those for actual personal relationships.  I *love* being able to pull everything into the RSS reader.  Wouldn’t mind a bit though if you did the “click through for full article” model.

  196. Daniel Jones says:

    Many read but don’t post or interact – like me.

  197. mpwolcott says:

    I subscribe via RSS and read most your articles. In fact I read almost all my news this way. I tend to read your article more often than others that I must click through to read. I simply don’t like to noise on a typical page. But that, obviously doesn’t help your page views for advertising.

    One of the innovations that have pushed my “click through” rate is Reeder integrating Readability into their product. I subscribe to Readability to support journalism. And with thee integration, I simply need to click my Readability button at the top of the page and I “click through” without having to leave my feed reader.

    So my question is: Would that provide you the data you need? At least you would be paid some amount by Readability. But that probably wouldn’t make up for lost add revenue.

    Or in the end, do you just want to know your being heard and make a difference. I get this also since I’m a university prof.

    Thanks for your writings.

  198. Daniel Carruth says:

    RSS reader.

  199. Guest says:

    Greader here

  200. Autumn says:

    Also read, but rarely comment or click through.  I love RSS.  I read far more content with RSS than I ever would without it.  

    As for your blog, I probably read about 70% of your content.

  201. Jake Gmerek says:

    I read on RSS as well

  202. Devin Baillie says:

    RSS will never die!!!!!!

  203. narendra says:

    Definitely not dead.  I have certain feeds appear in my Apple mail.  Wondering how closely the Google Reader metrics would mirror interaction on your Twitter feed.

  204. Can’t live without RSS, personally…

    Still, it is just by chance that I happened to read this while at my desk rather than on my phone (if I were on my phone, I probably wouldn’t have commented). And I usually don’t bother reading articles regarding the death of RSS, but I just happened to be towards the end of my RSS queue, so I figured why not. So I don’t know how much stock I would place in the metrics gathered by this exercise as I’m not sure how much it truly correlates to your readership.  

    On the other hand I suppose it’s better than nothing.

  205. John Bogrand says:

    I read by RSS.  Not every article but it is there for me to look quickly through it and a title will grab my attention when I have time.  So I think you should provide it similar to how ARS Techncia provides there feed where some of the juicy stories only read the first paragraphs in the RSS and then you click on a link to see the whole thing.  Then when you get clicks on those links you’ll get a much better understanding of how big your RSS readership really is.  I love RSS so please keep publishing that way just add in some new mechanisms to measure your readership. 

  206. Dale Romine says:

    Maybe I’m getting old but I much prefer RSS over Twitter, Facebook, you name it.

  207. Dale Romine says:

    Maybe I’m getting old but I much prefer RSS over Twitter, Facebook, you name it.

  208. Ann says:

    Reading via RSS in my email. I usually click through each article and stop to read relevant ones or leave them in the feed to return to.

  209. Dale Romine says:

    Maybe I’m getting old but I much prefer RSS over Twitter, Facebook, you name it.

  210. AlH says:

    I am also reading via RSS.  Same as most of the rest… Not much commenting, but checking the headlines daily and reading a bunch of articles.

  211. Joe Leyba says:

    Token RSS reader comment.

  212. RSSNotDead says:

    I read via RSS.

  213. Gwmb says:

    I read via RSS.  To make sure I do, I continually “weed” my feeds for those that continue to be worthwhile.

  214. Clark68 says:

    still use RSS heavily, and always read your posts. RSS allows me to be exposed to an incredible breadth of content, but I control how and *when* I consume it. Twitter and other options feel too “on” all the time. Perhaps a generational thing.

  215. R64 says:

    RSS reader checkin’ in!

  216. fwolf says:

    I wonder why so many people who pronounce RSS dead do not seem to realize that RSS is an infrastructure, not a solution.  It is more like a pipeline and not like oil (and definitely not like cars or planes or anything else that consumes oil which runs through a pipeline).  Of course, if you think that RSS is a solution, you will be disappointed.  It would be great if people could start thinking of RSS as an infrastructure.  I am sure this would open their eyes and help them see how great RSS is.  So, please do not turn off your RSS feed!

  217. Andrew Keely+batelle says:

    Another RSS reader here.

  218. MarcusW13 says:

    I read all headlines and some articles. I really enjoy RSS and hope that, while it might never become very popular, it never goes away either. I wouldn’t read nearly as much stuff on the internet if it wasn’t for RSS and Google Reader.

  219. Anonymous says:

    Buh

  220. Anonymous says:

    I read via RSS and really appreciate it. I don’t have time to browse the web stuff randomly, but when something interesting hits my RSS feed, which I go through once a day, I read it in full.

  221. MarcusW13 says:

    I read all headlines and some articles. I really enjoy RSS and hope that, while it might never become very popular, it never goes away either. I wouldn’t read nearly as much stuff on the internet if it wasn’t for RSS and Google Reader.

  222. Karl Cottenie says:

    rss rocks

  223. Chris says:

    I’m reading via RSS.

  224. Randy Picker says:

    yes, I read it via rss.

  225. Allen Taylor says:

    I’ve long had a love-hate relationship with RSS. It’s great as a publisher. You can convince yourself that you are super important when you have reached a certain number of subscribers. But you can’t verify that your subscribers are reading. Neither can print magazines verify that their subscribers are reading. But then, they get paid whether the subscriber reads or not.

    As a reader, RSS gives me an option. I can read you or ignore you. I don’t have to visit your blog to do one or the other. You come to me. Then I choose. I rather like that option as I subscribe to several hundred daily blogs. Most of them I ignore. Sometimes I ignore yours.

    The truth is, I don’t have enough hours in a day to read every blog. Even the good ones. And there are a lot of blogs I like to read. But if I read every one I like to read every single day, then I’d never get any work done and my wife wouldn’t like me any more since my income is directly derived from my production level as a freelancer who produces content for myself and my modest collection of clients.

    When I do read, I read through my RSS feeder. I browse through the headlines every day. When I see one that catches my attention, I click on it. Sometimes it’s yours. Sometimes it isn’t. 

    So the answer to your question is this: I read all of your headlines. I read some of the blog posts. Rarely do I click and visit the blog, but if I do it’s either to comment (rarely) or to copy/paste the URL for an attribution link when something resonates with me enough that I want to use it as a trampoline. Make of that what you will.

  226. MarcusW13 says:

    If it wasn’t for RSS, I would read very little on the internet. I don’t have time to go out and find things. I comment on posts even less, but I’ll do it this once to show you RSS is still alive.

  227. Allen Taylor says:

    I’ve long had a love-hate relationship with RSS. It’s great as a publisher. You can convince yourself that you are super important when you have reached a certain number of subscribers. But you can’t verify that your subscribers are reading. Neither can print magazines verify that their subscribers are reading. But then, they get paid whether the subscriber reads or not.

    As a reader, RSS gives me an option. I can read you or ignore you. I don’t have to visit your blog to do one or the other. You come to me. Then I choose. I rather like that option as I subscribe to several hundred daily blogs. Most of them I ignore. Sometimes I ignore yours.

    The truth is, I don’t have enough hours in a day to read every blog. Even the good ones. And there are a lot of blogs I like to read. But if I read every one I like to read every single day, then I’d never get any work done and my wife wouldn’t like me any more since my income is directly derived from my production level as a freelancer who produces content for myself and my modest collection of clients.

    When I do read, I read through my RSS feeder. I browse through the headlines every day. When I see one that catches my attention, I click on it. Sometimes it’s yours. Sometimes it isn’t. 

    So the answer to your question is this: I read all of your headlines. I read some of the blog posts. Rarely do I click and visit the blog, but if I do it’s either to comment (rarely) or to copy/paste the URL for an attribution link when something resonates with me enough that I want to use it as a trampoline. Make of that what you will.

  228. Anonymous says:

    I’m reading via RSS. 

  229. Trezzer says:

    I am certainly not reading anything in my RSS feed ever. Including this. Or should that be excluding?)

  230. Ariane M Pawgang says:

    reading via RSS – all posts (wouldn’t do so without RSS)

  231. Henrik says:

    I’m reading via RSS.

  232. tucker says:

    rss is the best, yes.

  233. Tom says:

    Long time rss reader…

  234. Avichal says:

    I’m reading via RSS. Have been for years.

  235. Tom says:

    Long time rss reader…

  236. spill says:

    Yes I read via RSS.

  237. Stephan Packard says:

    I subscribe via RSS. When I read on the desktop PC, I usually click through — but very often, I open my RSS reader on handheld devices of various kinds, and then that’s more troublesome, sometimes — when I read previously downloaded posts in an area without internet access — even impossible. 

    So not only do I read your posts via RSS, but there was a good chance — call it 1 in 3, I guess — that I would have been unable to write this comment when I saw this post. Woruld I have made a note, mental or digital, and returned when I next found myself with internet access? Perhaps. I’m not sure.

  238. Stephan Packard says:

    I subscribe via RSS. When I read on the desktop PC, I usually click through — but very often, I open my RSS reader on handheld devices of various kinds, and then that’s more troublesome, sometimes — when I read previously downloaded posts in an area without internet access — even impossible. 

    So not only do I read your posts via RSS, but there was a good chance — call it 1 in 3, I guess — that I would have been unable to write this comment when I saw this post. Woruld I have made a note, mental or digital, and returned when I next found myself with internet access? Perhaps. I’m not sure.

  239. Aaron Lav says:

    I’m reading via RSS.

  240. Anonymous says:

    Loyal “Google Reader” reader here.

  241. Lee Wilmeth says:

    I use RSS to read more than 20k of headlines a month. While I prefer full feed RSS, I will click through to a web page if the article requires it. RSS is integral to my information acquisition work flow. So, you may count me as 1 of 664. I appreciate your content and the RSS feed that provides it. 

  242. Kevin says:

    dont kill the RSS

  243. Cory Jason says:

    I’m an RSS subscriber who scans your headlines, decides what looks interesting, and clicks through if I see something worthwhile.  I usually ignore “RSS is dead” news, as it patently is not, since I’m still using it daily, but you sucked me in this time…

  244. bert says:

    Yup, Google Reader. Think I’m subscribed to about 22 sites, read pretty much everything. Think clickthrough rate is in the order of 0.01% though. Seriously, including this.

  245. Daniel Jarratt says:

    I read most of your articles in full-text over RSS, and I depend on the RSS-GReader link to keep up with virtually everything online.  If a site doesn’t put full text in the feed, I will generally unsubscribe just because I don’t have time to remember to open everything in tabs and read later.  Hope your Reach metric improves; it seems likely that Feedburner isn’t counting correctly.  Seriously: 1 in 600 reach?  That’s a bit ludicrous for someone of your stature online.

  246. PeterV says:

    Google Reader guy

  247. Michiel says:

    I don’t use a dedicated RSS-reader, just Firefox plus Brief extension. I have Brief set up to only show headlines, so I usually click through to the articles when I think it’s an interesting one.
    If it weren’t for RSS, I would probably not visit your site very often.

  248. Badmacktuck says:

    i read ‘em all. but, yeah like others said – no real reason to click through – and requiring a login is tedious.

    thank you for all the hard work you put into this blog. keep it up.

  249. patrick mellinger says:

    i read ‘em all. but, yeah like others said – no real reason to click through – and requiring a login is tedious.

    thank you for all the hard work you put into this blog. keep it up.

  250. mklainer says:

    Avid RSS reader…

  251. Andy says:

    I read a lot via RSS. My own blog has (per Feedburner) 2,162 subscribers and a reach of 100. That’s 4.6%. But it’s highly specialized for an obscure profession….

  252. Neil Jensen says:

    Read them all via RSS, but rarely every click through.

  253. Joe Zorba says:

    Without RSS I would not be exposed to your content at all. I scan all my feeds through my yahoo every morning.

  254. I read *every* article via RSS. Thanks for continuing to post and share full-feed articles! :)

  255. Me says:

    Google Reader

  256. Jetset says:

    RSS is great medium for a set of consumers, a good tailored signal to noise ratio, being able to scan 100s of sources efficiently in little time, mentally building respect for those who have taken time to put down great insight. Not real-time (although sometimes near), no distracting content or links to links, I believe it’s a beautiful medium for those that wish to consume using it.

  257. Big A says:

    i’m reading!

  258. Foo says:

    I read your work almost every day.

  259. matt says:

    Read this in google reader!

  260. James Hepburn says:

    I can’t say that I read everything you post, but I browse everything you’ve posted since I added your RSS feed.  RSS is a great medium if you don’t like being inundated with advertisements…

  261. matt says:

    Read this in google reader!

  262. AlH says:

    I am also reading via RSS.  Same as most of the rest… Not much commenting, but checking the headlines daily and reading a bunch of articles.

  263. Toivo Lainevool says:

    I’m still an avid Google Reader user.

  264. Sigmund Hsu says:

    Reader is my workhorse

  265. Anonymous says:

    present and reading

  266. Joseph Smarr says:

    I read your stuff every day in Google Reader and love it. Please don’t stop providing full RSS feeds, and of course keep up the great blogging! :)

  267. Loki says:

    Well, it looks like you are halfway to reaching your goal of exceeding your reach *grin*.  Your posts show up in my RSS reader, and I happily read them – but beyond that I don’t interact with them much because there is no need to.  You rarely make posts that require further interaction…  because you (happily) provide everything we need in the single post.

    keep it up!

  268. crc says:

    Without RSS, there is no way I can stay on top of the mountain of blogs required to keep up with the technologies I use every day. I almost never comment, but nonetheless I’m a reader whale who clicks through links in feeds when they’re interesting and appropriate, who shares a dozen articles every day, and also who will write a scraper to get full-text feeds if the author doesn’t offer them. Excerpts are BS.

    From my perspective, you’re doing the right thing all around. Your content is good, you respect your readers enough (and are confident enough in your words) to offer a full-text feed. I wouldn’t be sad to see ads in your feed as long as they don’t break my reader.

    • Anonymous says:

      Wish there was a way to put ads in the reader in a way that actually worked

      • Colin Creitz says:

        I get text ads in a few of my feeds, which don’t seem to break anything. I even get narrow (460px, maybe?) banners in a few, which (again) don’t seem to break anything. One feed even tried to sneak in Flash ads, which caused me to drop it, as that was breaking Google Reader, and writing a feed proxy seemed like more work than it was worth.

  269. Colin Creitz says:

    Without RSS, there is no way I can stay on top of the mountain of blogs required to keep up with the technologies I use every day. I almost never comment, but nonetheless I’m a reader whale who clicks through links in feeds when they’re interesting and appropriate, who shares a dozen articles every day, and also who will write a scraper to get full-text feeds if the author doesn’t offer them. Excerpts are BS.

    From my perspective, you’re doing the right thing all around. Your content is good, you respect your readers enough (and are confident enough in your words) to offer a full-text feed. I wouldn’t be sad to see ads in your feed as long as they don’t break my reader.

  270. Feroz Abdul Kadar says:

    Here’s (my) vote (via Reader)! ;-)

  271. Orit Levi says:

    Reading on G reader.

  272. Orit Levi says:

    Reading on G reader.

  273. Christopher says:

    While I fear for the future of RSS, since its use seems restricted primarily to news junkies and tech geeks, its an incredibly useful technology. Long live RSS.

  274. Rogerio Marques says:

    I read all headlines and some articles and I use NNW.

  275. Rogerio says:

    I read all headlines and some articles and I use NNW.

  276. George M. says:

    I recently subscribed in Google Reader, but I seldom click back, either to read the comments or, even rarer, to post one – like now. 

  277. George M. says:

    I recently subscribed in Google Reader, but I seldom click back, either to read the comments or, even rarer, to post one – like now. 

  278. RSS here. Life will suck when/if it’s gone. 

  279. Nick Altebrando says:

    Hi from a google reader reader

  280. Jeff says:

    Yeah, right.  RSS is dead just like email is dead.  In other words, not at all.  If a technology serves a purpose, AND that purpose is not being served anywhere else, AND it’s not getting in the way of anything, it’s not going away any time soon.  The case is possibly stronger for RSS than email in the sense that email does present a multitude of security problems.  RSS is utterly harmless, I believe.

  281. Marco Eder says:

    Reading on GReader, but getting more and more content via twitter and gplus to compete with reader feeds.
    Thanks for your full feed btw – your definitely gets more of my attention this way!

  282. Pet peeve time.

    I’m writing this comment because I found this post through Google Reader.  And your reported increase in subscribers is impressive, John.  So yes, RSS is still a mechanism by which (very qualified) readers discover new content, however much it may be a limited subset of Internet users.

    But (and here’s the pet peeve part) RSS has a utility that extends far past subscriptions.  A topical website with zero subscribers to its RSS feed is still benefiting from the existence of that feed.

    First, RSS remains the most efficient way of pushing content to multiple data consumers (including search engines) through pinging on publish (or even more efficiently, by using PubSubHubbub).  A blog that does not employ XML sitemaps can still see posts appear in Google’s index minutes after publication because when you ping Google Blog Search (or a distributed ping target like Pingomatic that includes it) Google globally indexes that post (i.e. you’re pinging Blog Search but it appears in the main index).

    Second, RSS provides – as it has for years – rich structured data to search engines, aggregators and other data consumers.  This enables those data consumers to connect dots and return useful information about authors, sources, canonical link targets, topics, dates and more.

    Its a pet peeve because the “RSS is dead” meme inevitably focuses on RSS solely as a subscription utility.

    (So well-structured RSS is important if one is going to employ it at all, but I’ll talk about that famous dc:creator “jbat” in an upcoming post of my own on author citations.:)

    • Anonymous says:

      Very good points, thank you.

    • bb says:

      re : Pet peeve time.

      Google removed the sharing functionality built into Reader, and replaced it with a +1 button. Users criticized Google+ in the redesign because it dismantled existing social networks that had formed by disabling sharing and publishing functions. Adding difficulty in transferring social contacts, and highlighting issues around data portability.
      RSSOwl 2.1 released July 15, 2011 with new features include Google Reader synchronization support which synchronizes fulltext searches of selected Google Reader and selected RSS feeds. In addition to its full text searches, saved searches, notifications, newsgroups, and filters, you can blog news viewed in RSSOwl with your favorite blogging tool.

      http://www.rssowl.org/overview2

  283. Ludlow says:

    I see your RSS feed in my Mailwasher, but mostly I just blow it out because you are in my coffeecup and I look at your column everyday. If for some reason I’m out of town for a few days, then I’ll check the RSS to see what I missed.  So to some extent I use both. 

  284. Alberto Ingenito says:

    My feeds are almost the only access I use to “entertainment” content (not work, not info, just enjoying reading)…
    That said I think I’ve posted less then 10 comments over the years…

  285. Esf Hrs says:

    I frequently read your posts in GR. I don’t think RSS is dead, nor do I think the numbers are true. 

  286. Asayare says:

    Live human interested in your thoughts and insights – but rarely compelled to click through or comment.  Always wondered about whether Google Reader somehow captured articles actually read and passed that info back to publishers.  Appreciate your full articles in the reader.  Makes my exercise of “reading the world” each day faster and simpler. Thank you!

  287. Mike Creuzer says:

    RSS via Google Reader here.

    I skim probably 60-70 percent of the articles in my 180+ list of feeds. I do read all the headlines.

    A lot of stuff gets cataloged as been written about in my head, and a Google search will find it for me again when I am called upon to remember it.

    So, the few ‘interactions’ I’ve had with your content tends to be days or weeks after you publish and appears to be a channel other than RSS.

  288. Ally says:

    RSS is alive and well… (and I didn’t even know of your blog the last time you asked the question so I couldn’t have commented then…)

  289. Frank says:

    always read, rarely comment

  290. Kyle Wegner says:

    I’m here, I promise! (RSS is not dead. It’s the best way that everyone I know who is really into online news reading still gets their news)(Parenthesis FTW).

  291. Martin Tassara says:

    Reading all your post from Google Reader!  That reach number is off!

  292. Dteeter says:

    RSS reader here

  293. bernie says:

    still reading rss.

  294. markbrian says:

    Got here via RSS. I never read stuff in my reader, I always click to the original for some reason.

  295. SugarGimp says:

    long time RSS reader, first time commenter.

    keep it coming

  296. bruno boutot says:

    Google Reader, twice a day.

  297. Adrian Price says:

    Long-time Google Reader reader, and I watch more closely (i.e., Mark As Read less often) now that I’m working directly in the digital marketing industry.

  298. Wheele8 says:

    I concur

  299. Adrian Price says:

    Long-time Google Reader reader, and I watch more closely (i.e., Mark As Read less often) now that I’m working directly in the digital marketing industry.
    Also, posting comments doesn’t seem to work in Chrome. That may have something to do with it. (Clicking post does nothing at all.) That means I had to open FireFox, log into my Google account (including 2-step verification, since I wasn’t signed in at all), and then post the comment. That should count as at least two votes ;)

  300. Tanya Jayne Park says:

    Here are my Google Reader ‘Trends’ stats for today -

    From your 119 subscriptions, over the last 30 days you read 10,377 items,clicked 74 items, starred 0 items, andemailed 0 items.Since December 31, 2010 you have read a total of 125,336 items.
    Certainly not dead for me!

  301. Lesv says:

    I read your blog in the rss feed.  Adding an ad to the feed isn’t that difficult.

  302. jcardillo says:

    Reading from Google Reader!

  303. Henrik says:

    I read via Google Reader

  304. Tanya-Jayne Park says:

    Here are my Google Reader ‘Trends’ stats for today -
    From your 119 subscriptions, over the last 30 days you read 10,377 items,clicked 74 items, starred 0 items, andemailed 0 items.Since December 31, 2010 you have read a total of 125,336 items.
    Certainly not dead for me!I also have the same problem with posting in chrome

  305. Anonymous says:

    Our “full-text” media company customers are seeing a 34%
    read rate and a 8% click-through rate on content items in their RSS Feeds. We
    know because our company, SimpleFeed, manages RSS Feeds for a good chunk of the
    Fortune 500.

     

    While traditional RSS reading has coalesced around Google Reader,
    RSS is thriving in iPad apps and content syndication. For example, according to
    MajesticSEO your RSS Feed is syndicated onto 87 web pages. The growth story for
    RSS in 2012 is in iPad information aggregators (Flipboard, Pulse, Zite, Currents,
    etc.). As these aggregators are getting RSS content via Twitter signals and/or
    Google Reader integration, FeedBurner is less successful in reporting these
    interactions.

     

    I am not surprised your subscribership have doubled. RSS
    continues to grow despite being “dead.” For most publishers and marketers, RSS produces
    more content consumption and click-throughs than Twitter or Facebook (where we
    also publish).

  306. No says:

    I’m a dedicated RSS skimmer, and find this service valuable.

  307. Mr DC says:

    I use Snackr – giving me a scrolling news ticker at the bottom of my screen of all my Google Reader RSS headlines. If a headline intrigues me I click through to read it.  I used to only remember to logon to Reader once every few weeks, now it’s always right there ready for me to dip into it when I need a distraction.

    The fact that I am reading (and even commenting) on this post proves your RSS feed is worth it – I have been to some sites that don’t have an RSS feed, which frustrates me, because it basically means I’ll never serendipitously read content from that site again because it’s not being pushed to me (the only way I might read it is if it happens to come up in a web search for something I am researching at the time).

    It also highlights the importance of writing good (ie. intrguing) titles for blog posts (another commenter here also noted how they just scan headlines).

  308. Guest says:

    Not much for comments.  Reading on RSS.

  309. Andromeda says:

    I read some of your posts, not all of them.  Also depends on what type of day I am having so it varies day by day.  However, I definitely use my RSS reader every single day.

  310. Tina Femea says:

    I’m reading.  RSS only.

  311. Jacques says:

    I read most of your posts in my reader.
    I will not consistently follow a website that doesn’t have a full RSS feed.

  312. I use Netvibes to collect my RSS feeds – easy to scan headlines and I have a public page so I can share with my students. I click through to your site to read the full article quite often.

  313. Weaties+bat says:

    Rss is the primary way I read

  314. Shan Shah says:

    I <3 RSS

  315. Ryan Frost says:

    RSS w/ Google Reader

  316. Kirk Nordgren says:

    reading rss via google reader.

  317. Jerry Hill says:

    I still read everything through RSS.

  318. Tadpol says:

    Use google reader as a sync service. Do all the reading in either netnewswire or byline. Not sure what that does to the numbers.

  319. Rssisalive says:

    RSS is ALIVE, alive I say!

  320. Penguin says:

    Just subscribed to RSS after reading the emails for a few dayhs.

  321. Colin Rafferty says:

    Love your blog — love the full RSS!

  322. Hello, I came here from Google Reader. Then I had to change to a different browser because Disqus doesn’t work with one of my Firefox plugins. (Which one? Who knows…) Then I had to sign in with Twitter, which meant looking up my Twitter password.

    I suspect that some people who came to comment just gave up.

  323. Larry Hosken says:

    Oh God how did this get here i am not good with feeds

  324. Danielle Booth says:

    Hello from RSSland!

  325. I subscribe to you in my Google Reader and read you in my Reeder reader.

  326. Shawn McCann says:

    Keep up the great work John – I’m listening!

  327. Still here after all these years…

  328. Joe Parker says:

    Been reading from Google reader for over two years.

  329. Li Haan says:

    I do read your posts but rarely (almost never) click through to your site.

  330. Bob says:

    RSS is alive.

  331. Francisco Juan says:

    Keep RSS alive!! I’m not a commenter person. Not only in your blog but in all my inspiration sources. I’ve left no more than 100 comments since September 2006, while my reader stats say I’ve read about 30K articles.

  332. CoryOBrien says:

    Count me as 1 of 664.

  333. simon says:

    bloody hell John you put the request not in the last sentence but the penultimate one!  That probably reduces things even more, whack it in bold in the first line (I always read at least your first para, but normally the whole post…but I will tend to tail off; I think I follow the known patterns of reading newspapers, etc. probably).

    • Anonymous says:

      Simon if you’r not from the UK I’ll be dismayed. But your point is taken, I may have to factor up the count just for burying the lead .

  334. Guest says:

    Still on google reader here. Twitter/Facebook/Google+ is still no good for finding things outside of the echo chamber.

  335. Andrew Smit says:

    Rss is still alive, according to me anyway.

  336. Anonymous says:

    Good post — read it first on Flipboard

  337. I read your blog via RSS John and read the entire post. So life is good here.

  338. David says:

    I use RSS as my main way to scan and read multiple sites.  I would not be reading this post if not for RSS.

  339. Guest says:

    For what it’s worth John, I read RSS everyday. However, I tend to read some feeds in bursts. I had not read your’s for a couple of weeks and just started catching up today. Saw this and wanted to let you know of an anecdotal experience. 

  340. Test says:

    still reading

  341. Tbrady says:

    read all your posts in reader

  342. Nah says:

    Rss forevs

  343. Hugh O'Brien says:

    RSS is for reading, Facebook and Twitter feeds are for gazing. 

    I’ll take RSS any day.

  344. Ged Carroll says:

    John, the big issue is less your audience and more about the Feedburner metrics. I use Feedburner but I don’t believe the data. There are lies, damn lies and statistics. There is also a second implied assumption in your comment that all readers are created equal – that’s the kind of lame thinking that drove much of the dunderheaded strategic choices that were made during my brief time at Yahoo!; but that’s a story for another time. RSS is alive with the people that really matter.

    Best regards,

    Ged Carroll

  345. sathyan says:

    ‘The Search’ changed the way i look at web and my career.  Thank you.
    But this is my first comment; and i came to this post clicking on your tweet;

    Its been a long time i used a reader.

  346. Edward Greggs says:

    RSS is very much alive for me. I do increasingly find news through Twitter and Facebook. An while there are gems to be found on social networks. It would be a pretty haphazard, a hit-and-miss way of getting all your news.

    I love RSS. By consistently hearing from the same person you get a lot better understanding. Much richer.

    Viva RSS.

  347. Ted says:

    RSS is very much alive for me. I do increasingly find news through Twitter and Facebook. An while there are gems to be found on social networks. It would be a pretty haphazard, a hit-and-miss way of getting all your news.

    I love RSS. By consistently hearing from the same person you get a lot better understanding. Much richer.

    Viva RSS.

  348. Someone says:

    Another reader for your count.

  349. Ted says:

    RSS is very much alive for me. I do increasingly find news through Twitter and Facebook. An while there are gems to be found on social networks. It would be a pretty haphazard, a hit-and-miss way of getting all your news.

    I love RSS. By consistently hearing from the same person you get a lot better understanding. Much richer.

    Viva RSS.

  350. Dave says:

    RSS reader

  351. Angel B says:

    RSS is the backbone of my Internet usage. Even with an emasculated Google Reader, RSS feed are my primary source of content.

    Regards from Mexico

  352. Angel B says:

    RSS is the backbone of my Internet usage. Even with an emasculated Google Reader, RSS feed are my primary source of content.

    Regards from Mexico City ;)

  353. Stevea says:

    I read regularly via RSS

  354. Chris Brooks says:

    Yep, I read all the way through many of your posts in RSS.
    -Chris

  355. Simon Dufour says:

    Your blog is lost among my thousands of posts per day in my RSS feed. I don’t read them all the time. Most of the time, I’ll make a “Mark all as read” to have less clutter the next day. 

  356. E Dahl says:

    I would read far fewer blogs without rss

  357. Josh Grupp says:

    I just started reading your blog this month via igoogle via a feed. Not sure if that counts as rss, but I love reading your posts! Keep em coming!

  358. mangopants says:

    I appreciate your RSS feed, and it helps me stay connected to you.  Truth be told, if you weren’t in my feed, I’d forget about you.   :(

    • Guest says:

      Like mangopants, I believe you should cling to your RSS subscribers. So many would have forgotten about you without this simple piece of technology.  Now try to persuade Google that we should be able to add a RSS feed into a circle in Google+…

  359. jason says:

    I spend at least an hour in Google Reader every day.  RSS is invaluable to me but it’s still a mystery for my non-tekkie friends or parents.  

  360. Guest says:

    Rss reader

  361. Carl Collins says:

    It’s not about conversations? It’s about the fact you’ve put things on the internet fo-evah?

    But really, if it wasn’t for RSS I wouldn’t be able to keep track of what I intended to read.

  362. Davide Tassinari says:

    I wonder if the merge of google Buzz in reader has anything to do with it? Or is it just dormant accounts of people who subscribe one day and ignore it for the rest of time?

  363. Ben Murray says:

    I read your stuff through RSS, I would guess I “read” about 1 in 3 of yours in particular and click through to most of those.  In january I have clicked through to at least 5 of your posts.

    I hope that helps!

  364. DaveGoulden says:

    Google Reader is alive and well for me.

  365. Noemail says:

    alive and well.

  366. Bruce Warila says:

    I didn’t read all of the comments here to see if I am being redundant… I only read posts that are entirely published to RSS, and I rarely click through excerpted posts, as there are way too many other great choices (in my daily feeds) to bother with excerpted posts. 

    I save long posts to Instapaper, and then I share (via Twitter) if the posts are truly excellent.  I only click back to a publisher’s site if I feel I am going to learn something from the comments on a certain article.  Ads suck.  Find another way to monetize your excellent articles :)

     

  367. Allon Yosha says:

    RSS reader checking in. Can’t go a day without it.

  368. Michael Jones says:

    Oh, so that’s what your site looks like!

  369. Bill says:

    Read you regularly…via RSS.

  370. Guest says:

    I read every post via Google Reader, and I Tweet the good ones out. You rock. So does RSS. -@ethan

  371. I regard my RSS as my reading backlog, I browse it once a week using iPad based apps such as Flud. It offsets the need to read daily and it makes for a more enjoyable “reading time” where I can scan through much of my curated content at will. Long live RSS!!  

  372. Anonymous says:

    What’s the ratio of comments to page views on an average post.

  373. pat hendriks says:

    I have all my technology rss feeds set up in my google reader.  I browse it every day to see what’s up.  I seldom comment, but I read a good number of the day’s feed. It’s too cumbersome to visit each site to catch the headlines and important articles.  I find that rss is my way of  keeping up with a varieity of tech topics from many sites/writers.

     In fact I recently sent a “bug report” to a site to notify them their rss feed wasn’t updating.   

  374. Seth says:

    Nice shades.

  375. Jeremiah Dodds says:

    I consistently read your content, although sometimes I have quite the backlog.

  376. Brad Templeton says:

    It’s true that when I post a link to my blog posts in my G+ or Facebook feeds, they usually get more comments than on the very blog they clicked to.

  377. Andrew Anker says:

    Hi John… still a loyal RSS reader too. I think it’s an old/young thing (as is regular reading of blogs). Except for my tenure in the industry, my kids wouldn’t have a clue what either RSS or a blog is.

    • Anonymous says:

      Yeah we are old, but at least we can still roll down a window in a Cuban car Great to hear from you AA!

      Sent from my crippled apple device

  378. Another RSS-reader reader declaring myself!

  379. Niek Beaujean says:

    here

  380. Mikewmcleod says:

    OK – yes – I read your crap on RSS – google reader.

  381. jpdefillippo says:

    I don’t know about all these kinds and their fancy Google Reader but you’ll have to pry NetNewsWire from my cold dead hands… RSS isn’t dead, it just doesn’t monetize for shit.

  382. Carlos Sánchez Mateo says:

    reading!

  383. NickH says:

    Love RSS. Reading via greader and newsrob on android phone. offline reafing very handy for commute on the tube. Loved the last book, looking foward to next. Blog cool too :-)

  384. Anonymous says:

    I couldn’t live without RSS.  Google Reader says I have 621 subscriptions.

  385. Anonymous says:

    I couldn’t live without RSS.  Google Reader says I have 621 subscriptions.

  386. FWIW, since a lot of status-casting and chatter has moved off to Twitter and Facebook, the quality of things I find in my aggregator seems to have improved significantly.

  387. Geoffrey Bonnycastle says:

    Always read via RSS on Google Reader. 

  388. Old Lady says:

    I read your RSS feed and RARELY go to your actual blog. I use Flipboard and Google Reader to get your feed.

  389. Jason says:

    Reading from netvibes

  390. NotSocial says:

    I usually scan the titles and read/click if the first few lines interest me.  It doesn’t bother me to click and read the article on the respective site.

  391. Niek de Greef says:

    Don’t think I’ve ever even seen you site…. G Reader only!

  392. Foo says:

    commenting is a pain.

  393. Not Really says:

    I didn’t comment the last time around, as Ghostery blocks Disqus. Making an effort, this time :)

  394. Maciej Głuszek says:

    Reading every post in Google Reader
    Keep up the good work John!
    Thanks

  395. Edwin Stauthamer says:

    I use RSS feeds every day and love it when a site putts the whole content in the RSS feed so that I don’t have to leave my Reader when reading.
    Without RSS-feeds it would be impossible to keep up with all those different publishers. Image visiting every site to read the latest headlines of articles.But… I do realize that I have MANY RSS-feeds in my Reader of which I only read a dozen regularly.Along the way in past years I’ve collected quite an impressive list of interestng RSS-feeds.

    But I don’t manage my collections of feeds. By now I guess that half the sites are down of not beeing updated anymore. 

  396. Joe King1 says:

    i regularly read you’re articles through Google reader

  397. Anonymous says:

    I’m reading via RSS, or at least take note of new posts. Often click through to read the entire post.

  398. Rupert angel says:

    Read you through rss without fail, the easiest way to keep in touch

  399. I’m a proud RSS reader.  But I have to admit, I don’t know anyone else who uses RSS out of all my friends/acquaintances.  And not knowing ANYONE ELSE who uses a web product I use is pretty much unheard of for me.

    I don’t know why it’s so hard to convince people of its value, but the conversation just never seems to go down well.  Maybe it’s just TOO direct.  With RSS, there’s literally NOTHING BUT CONTENT (and in-line ads, mostly from O’Reilly Media).  It’s a very intentional form of content consumption, and maybe there’s not quite enough hand-holding or “serendipity” for most people.

    I should add a plea to please never turn RSS off on your site. I would have no idea how else to follow the feeds I’m interested in as well as I do now without it. I consider myself just lucky that pretty much all the site-building software I’ve seen has RSS publishing as a very simple process (often turned on by default with site owners having no idea).

  400. John, I regularly read and follow your posts but please get rid of your crippled apple device 

  401. Anonymous says:

    I admit I use RSS less than I used to, but many of my techy friends use it still everyday. I just taught another person what it was, and there really is no replacement for it yet…if you plan to seek out subscribed sources yourself. If you’re a person subscriber, a la twitter/facebook, then you may not use it as much. But, it’s not dead. Pulse reader on Android, for example, is still the best news aggro around.

    I think the real problem is that people are reading less online in general. Being inundated with news feeds, people statuses, and blog posts is hard to keep up with, and even thinking about it is a turn off for many.

  402. Tmkasten says:

    read your rss headline through netvibes. at this point i have trained myself to focus on reading the full rss feeds more often, so i rarely look at the headlines of the partial rss feed sources any more.

  403. [...] I posted my call to action last week, nearly 600 folks have raised their hands and told me they’re reading this site via [...]

  404. rsser says:

    RSSination

  405. fishead says:

    commenting just to add to your count—RSS is still ok, google reader works, g+ is tolerable, but full text in reader view is excellent!

  406. X_rotorhead says:

    Echoing many commenters, I am a busy fellow and haven’t the time to go hunting through a multiplicity of sites every day.  I get ALL my news through a variety of RSS feeds.  And I rarely read comments, much less post my own.  So keep the RSS going.  Thanks!

  407. Hakim Badshah says:

    I read yur post using RSS in Greader

  408. Anonymous says:

    Thanks a lot for your full-read rss feed, appreciate it!

  409. Matthew Friedrichs says:

    Still reading via RSS

  410. Mahendra says:

    For those like me who’re in the news/media field, RSS remains a vital and critical tool. I have been reading your blog in my Google Reader for years and am glad you’re retaining the full-text feed – many thanks!

  411. Lrossouw says:

    Your website didn’t alow me to comment a week ago.  I am using RSS.

  412. Roger says:

    I read you via reeder on my iPhone. Rss is critical and somehow our industry needs to get it back in the spotlight.

    Also the dsqus

  413. Jeremy Arnold says:

    Yep.. using Google Reader to follow this blog.. its on my must read!

  414. Dietmar Walser says:

    every Entry will be seen on Google Reader :-)

  415. None says:

    I read via RSS

  416. Bookboy44 says:

    Google Reader on my iPad, without RSS I wouldn’t be reading this

  417. Me says:

    Google reader

  418. Scientist in Search Industry says:

    I regularly read your blog via an RSS feed in My Yahoo.

  419. Michael B. says:

    RSS Reader is the best news source online. Period.

  420. Lou Poulas says:

    I live by RSS and read this blog all the time from Google Reader

  421. Tizio says:

    I hadn’t commented yet for just one reason….
    For some reason comments weren’t working on my FF installation…. :)

    I’m an avid reader of your RSS feed.
    And I won’t read all your posts without RSS

  422. Timothy Post says:

    Pinging you from southern Russia via Google Reader and RSS.

  423. Olivier Berthommé says:

    I am a RSS reader and can’t switch to your website because of my employer proxy…

  424. Mark Gannon says:

    I am an RSS reader.  I look at RSS at least once a day and probably more using the Akregator RSS reader that is part of the Linux KDE suite.

  425. I am following your posts via Bloglines.  Thanks.

  426. Maddie Grant says:

    I read you by RSS. :)

    xx

  427. Mike Dorsey says:

    RSS > Google Reader. Google Reader Folder > Flipboard. I read your RSS in flipboard.

  428. Thanks for all the posts and keep ‘em flowing. Posting as a full feed consumer and to be honest I don’t get to visit the actual site too much.

  429. Candradāsa Dharmachārī says:

    I only read this blog by RSS! :)

  430. John Liebhardt says:

    I also still like and use rss. I am new to the blog, but I really like what I read so far

  431. Jeff Clark says:

    I’m reading via RSS.

  432. Timmers says:

    Oh wow, there’s website?
    ;)

  433. SpaceBass says:

    Google Reader for me. Your follow-up post shamed me into biting the bullet to add this comment.

  434. dsims says:

    I check my RSS feeds once every few weeks.  That can’t be done with Social Networks.  I would love to see Google support Google Reader like how they pimp Google Plus.

  435. DCop says:

    I follow you on rss using an iPod touch. Bonus points?

  436. Peter De Keer says:

    No! Its not dead! Long live RSS ;-)

  437. H Chao says:

    RSS reader here

  438. Geoff S. says:

    nice site, kind of an RSS troll but figured i would throw a comment out there, love the feed, i have all the sites i visit regularly in my reader, full feed IS nice BTW.

  439. Craig says:

    I’m still RSS reading in my mail client. Don’t want to follow various bloggers on Twitter just to be informed when they have a new blog post.

  440. John I use Feedly to read feeds and your blog popped up as a recommended subscription. I checked the RSS subscriber base and reach. sciencebase.com has about 5000 RSS subscribers and its reach is currently 514. So, I reckon something is awry with your subscriber base. I suspect a huge number of those might simply be splogs or other bot systems scraping your content rather than readers.

  441. A. says:

    I almost never comment on anything but I am an avid reader of many feeds, yours included. Commenting now just because of your request/test and because I think RSS is one of the most useful things on the internet (such a shame it’s getting a ‘dead’ rep).

    Regards from SI-EU!

  442. Lexi Baugher says:

    I consume most of my internet reading in google reader so that i can download a bunch of stuff and read it on the bus.

  443. Didier Leboutte says:

    one more comment to support RSS (through google reader)

  444. boris says:

    RSS. Via http://www.rsshero.com. Which we built because we couldn’t live without the follow / share functionality that Google Reader nuked.

  445. Commenting after coming in via RSS… I’d have to cynically say, this post almost feels like “Sweep” month for your blog. Boost up the numbers once a year to get better advertising revenue for the balance of the year…

    I am curious to know if Martin Luther’s friends ever said, “Tracts are dead, it’s all about books now!” 

  446. Tim Kastelle says:

    I’m reading in the reader.

  447. Sumanto says:

    Use Google Reader to read your posts. Please keep using RSS feed.

  448. Jutsu says:

    Google Reader but usually click through to your site anyway.

  449. Anonymous says:

    No!  Don’t fake kill your RSS feed!  (Clapping hands) I believe in fairies!  I believe in fairies!  (Or 1990′s era Julia Roberts in Tinkerbell getup, one of the two.)

  450. Ganesh Nayak says:

    I started using reader again, after it came to limelight owing to G+ integration… It has made my life really easy and now I am able to follow lot more websites… Will surely put battellemedia on my subscriber list….

    As of now I do not see what can replace the efficiency of a rss… 

  451. John Magnus says:

    Subscribe to your feed in Google Reader and still read most of your posts. Though once every now and then I’m a few posts behind being current, but thats just one of the nice things with RSS – I can be; I can catch up whenever it suits me…Actually read the post last night using Google Reader on my Android device. Added it to my follow-up queue as commenting frome the phone were to much of a hassle (didn’t even remember if I had a Disqus account – I had…). Account/Login required to comment is a high barrier for engagement…

    • Anonymous says:

      I agree. I will go back and look at this. I thought anyone could just comment as anonymous might have changed the settings inadvertently.

  452. publishingOnlineSince1995 says:

    RSS is dead. You are right. The web is littered with RSS based services gone bellyup (pageFlakes anyone).  RSS was and remains too hard for non-techs. Most RSS readers sucked (Google’s was perhaps the only exception and it’s clear they don’t care for it much of late)  Twitter is RSS for the masses – just headlines only. Facebook’s wall is really just a RSS reaer that resonated with the users (and was limited to feeds from within the walls of Facebook).

    RSS is not dead. Search engines love RSS feeds, RSS is symantic web 101, All good web services are really just RSS on steroids. RSS stands for Really Simple SYNDICATION (emphasis on Syndication for good reason). Never drop your RSS feeds – just don’t for one minute think it is a means of directly connecting with, say, 394,770 readers, cause it’s near useless as a means of building audience.

    (I’m not on a RSS reader and I stopped using one years ago)

    • publishingOnlineSince1995 says:

       I should add that I got here via another of your articles – arrived at via some other website (ZD Net or Paid Content I think) that no doubt uses a syndication service like Onespot to filter, manage and edit the ginormous mashup of RSS feeds that drives tens of thousands of such publications.

  453. Theo Andrew says:

    Normally read via GReader on ‘droid mobile

  454. Adam Lopresto says:

    I read all your posts…eventually. Sometimes, it’s quite a while later, when I get behind, but I do try to get there eventually.

  455. Charlie says:

    Late but reading from RSS.

  456. Phl says:

    Just to confound the data. I wasn’t one of your RSS readers ’til I wandered across this post, but I am now. Keep the good work coming.

    As for the monetization question…so does it follow that RSS is a great choice for non-commercial sites (government, NGO, ….) that want to put out some news streams?

    • Anonymous says:

      Great choice for all information flows. We just need content to carry with it the potential of value back to author in some fashion other than pure attention

  457. Jr Pram says:

    Well, i have read this and i am sure that if it were not fir rss then.i wouldn’t have read this. there is too much of content fighting for contention

  458. Ray says:

    I always read via RSS.

  459. RSS is a big help…I tried using the ‘Command-D’ to bookmark sites, then I forget most of the sites ‘keywords’…(I’m old…yada yada). Since discovering RSS, I use NetNewsWire as my reader…organizing the most important sites the way I want. I reckon there are many more readers than you or the Goog may think. Good on ya for the full feed!

  460. Anonymous says:

    I’m about a month late, but that’s sort’ve the point of RSS, no? You can have all your news aggregated in one place but, more importantly, it is waiting for you when you get around to reading it. In a cascading world where what isn’t immediately read is all but lost, this is the main advantage of RSS.

  461. Maxi Dresses says:

    Well, i’ve go through this and i’m confident that if it have been not fir rss then.i wouldn’t have go through this. there is an excessive amount of of articles fighting for contention

  462. Joebertl says:

    i was looking on google if rss feeds are dead. Truly – according to your insights it seems they are for consumers. Great thing to share data between websites, but it seems that consumers ignore them ….

  463. Nick says:

    Without examing other data, I think I can make a guess based on my own RSS experience. My reader is loaded up with probably 40-50 sources, all catagorized. Each non-blogger source (which is the majority of my feed)probably feeds 5-10 articles a day at least. So the low estimate is that I am exposed to 200 articles on a daily basis just on my RSS alone. So if I were subscribed to you, you would probably make up just 0,005% of my feed if you updated one article each day.

  464. test says:

    testing this

  465. anon says:

    This post was only written to get comments. Readers are here, stop strying to force interactions with them.

  466. vonromantiko says:

    Actually. I’m visiting your website now and often =D great thinking about that iWatch

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