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Happy Election Day

The Rimm-Kaufman Group offers some very interesting results in a study of paid search ads in the swing Senate races of 2006. A few highlights from the study results: * Political pay-per-click advertisers use Google. Few political advertisers use Yahoo Paid Search. * There are few political advertisers: the…

The Rimm-Kaufman Group offers some very interesting results in a study of paid search ads in the swing Senate races of 2006. A few highlights from the study results:

* Political pay-per-click advertisers use Google. Few political advertisers use Yahoo Paid Search.

* There are few political advertisers: the average search results page for queries in this study returned only 3.7 ads.

* The most prevalent advertisers within this query set were Accoona (search engine), Gather.com (social networking), CafePress (retailer), and GOPSenators.com (National Republican Senatorial Committee).

* “Red” ads (pro-Republican or anti-Democrat) outnumbered “blue ads” (pro-Democrat or anti-Republican) two-to-one.

* No campaign ads referenced President Bush.

RKG focused on Google AdWords, in part because they found that the vast majority of political online ads went through AdWords. Their findings fuel the study’s conclusion that paid search is still in its infancy–despite providing similar reach at a fraction of a cost. And they’re likely quite right in predicting that online search ads will become increasingly important in the American political campaigns.

Plus: This week Battelle is busy on stage at Web 2.0. But though away from Searchblog on election day, he put the question to a few prominent business leaders, asking how their companies handle freedom of speech and privacy issues when federal law stands in opposition— interviewing Eric Schmidt, Arthur Sulzberger, and Barry Diller. There was a spontaneous round of applause for Google’s refusal to respect a federal demand for users’ search histories, and for The New York Times’ decision to disclose evidence of the government’s stealth spy program on its own citizens. Diller and Sulzberger also intoned on the multiplied difficulty of operating globally, where they face a variegated array of laws and cultures of government control. That was a point underlined when Jack Ma of Yahoo China/Alibaba said that, for him, abiding by the Chinese government’s censorship was simply a decision of ensuring that the areas where his company could improve peoples’ lives would continue to thrive.

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Help Us With a Web 2 Tagline

This year will mark the third annual Web 2.0 conference. It's not till November (the 7th-9th in SF, for anyone marking their calendars), but it's never too early to start thinking about it, at least, if you're the program chair like I am. One thing we have to do…

Web205Logo-5This year will mark the third annual Web 2.0 conference. It’s not till November (the 7th-9th in SF, for anyone marking their calendars), but it’s never too early to start thinking about it, at least, if you’re the program chair like I am.

One thing we have to do is give the conference a tagline, sort of like a theme in four words or less. The first year, we declared “The Web Is a Platform.” That felt spot on, because the idea of the web as a place you could build on the work of others was a pretty new idea. Last year we tagged it “Revving the Web,” because it was all about the services and businesses and opportunities that arose from the Web – all of which taken together made the web more robust and more exciting.

This year Tim and I have been bouncing around some ideas, and I’d love your take on what you think is an overarching theme to the Internet business for the year to come.

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MSFT: Next Step, Web 2.0

Microsoft has grand plans for a new "web platform" strategy. Cnet has the coverage. From it: The software company plans to open access to its MSN and other public Web sites to let developers assemble new applications that build on those sites–a technique used successfully at Google and at…

Microsoft has grand plans for a new “web platform” strategy. Cnet has the coverage. From it:

The software company plans to open access to its MSN and other public Web sites to let developers assemble new applications that build on those sites–a technique used successfully at Google and at other Web companies to promote their properties.

Microsoft will detail its “Web platform” strategy at its Professional Developers Conference in Los Angeles next week, company executives told CNET News.com. It intends to publish the application programming interfaces, or APIs, to some of its public Web sites, including MSN Search, and deliver better tools to write those applications.

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YubNub

I've been pointed twice in one week to YubNub, which bills itself as a "(social) command line for the web." YubNub is the result of a "program like hell for 24 hours" project, in fact, it came out of one guy's attempt to win a contest around the new…

YubnubI’ve been pointed twice in one week to YubNub, which bills itself as a “(social) command line for the web.”

YubNub is the result of a “program like hell for 24 hours” project, in fact, it came out of one guy’s attempt to win a contest around the new Ruby on Rails framework.

The idea of search as the command line for the web is well established, this takes the idea one step (or more) further, letting you set up commands in the search line itself. You can use the search line as a single point of reference for searching just about any web resource, and you can add your own, if you’re geeky enough (others will do it for you if you’re challenged like I am). From the post explaining YubNub:

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Web 2.0 v. 2.0: Your Input Needed

Last year around this time (well, a bit later, we were running a bit late…) I posted a plea for input on the new conference I was to chair called Web 2.0. You responded in spades, and it really helped me figure out a spectacular program, one that I…

Web205Logo-1Last year around this time (well, a bit later, we were running a bit late…) I posted a plea for input on the new conference I was to chair called Web 2.0. You responded in spades, and it really helped me figure out a spectacular program, one that I am still quite proud of.

This year we’re doing it again, and again I need your help, your input, and your ideas. The conference will again be in San Francisco October 5-7, this time at the Argent Hotel, and once again I am teaming with Tim O’Reilly and MediaLive to produce the event.

The program for the sophomore edition of Web 2.0 is inspired by the simple observation that while last year was all about declaring the web as a platform for new and innovative business models, this year it’s all about showing what can be done on that platform, and uncovering the innovative companies, ideas, and models from which all of us can learn. I’m (loosley) focusing on three areas that are truly taking off in 2005: Media & Entertainment, Communications (ie, the Web goes mobile and swallows telecom along the way), and the Web as OS.

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Yahoo Ups Mail Limit to 1 GB

Starting next month, Yahoo Mail will go to one gig. Platform wars, Ho! Release in extended, I don't have a link for the news, save the mail site, which does not mention it yet. One thing to note: According to figures I've seen lately, mail is about 40% of…

Yahoo MailStarting next month, Yahoo Mail will go to one gig. Platform wars, Ho! Release in extended, I don’t have a link for the news, save the mail site, which does not mention it yet. One thing to note: According to figures I’ve seen lately, mail is about 40% of all Yahoo page views, it’s the silent driver of profits at that company. And that’s why Google is pushing Gmail so hard lately – those pageviews drive profits.

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Web 2.0 2005 Dates, Location Announced

Today at ETech we announced details about Web 2.0's sophomore edition. Once again we are doing the event in San Francisco, and even on the same dates: Oct. 5-7. We've upgraded the hotel to the Argent, which is right across the street from SFMOMA and the Yerba Buena center….

Web2Today at ETech we announced details about Web 2.0’s sophomore edition. Once again we are doing the event in San Francisco, and even on the same dates: Oct. 5-7. We’ve upgraded the hotel to the Argent, which is right across the street from SFMOMA and the Yerba Buena center. The program is in very early stages of development, but we’ve got a great initial lineup of speakers committed, including Jeremy Allaire, who’s doing some interesting things with video over IP over at Bright Cove, Stewart Butterfield at Flickr, Tom Barton at Rackable (the company which literally builds the web platform – the computers for Google and many others), along with Scott Cook, Mark Cuban, Rob Burgess, Mary Meeker, Microsoft’s new CTO Ray Ozzie, and many more.

Our initial thinking behind this year’s event reflects an evolution of Web 2.0’s original theme, which was “the Web as Platform.” This year we take that as a given, and focus on what the opportunities and challenges are in this new web ecology, in particular services and businesses which run over the platform. Hence the tagline “revving the Web” – both adding power and features, as well as the idea of building the Web’s next iteration. Broad areas of focus included media & entertainment – an area which is clearly accelerating this year, communications (including Mobile and VOIP), and computing and OS (including the whole Web OS concept).

Here’s where you come in, much as last year, except we have more time this go round. I’m looking for amazing ideas, companies, and people to feature in High Order Bits and workshops. Last year we had more than 90 speakers by the time all was said and done, and I’m sure we’ll have just as many this year. Send any and all ideas to me at jbat at battellemedia dot com, and I very much look forward to seeing you in SF this Fall!

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Ad Tags

I have a riff brewing – but it ain't quite fermented – about ads and tagging. Some of this has been spurred on by conversations with folks like Andy at Waxy. There's something there, and recent developments, like comments on ads, is starting to point that way. Adding to…

I have a riff brewing – but it ain’t quite fermented – about ads and tagging. Some of this has been spurred on by conversations with folks like Andy at Waxy. There’s something there, and recent developments, like comments on ads, is starting to point that way. Adding to the meme, Jeff Jarvis, who has been my posting partner on the whole PDA/Sell Side advertising concept, is already riffing on ads and tags. This is a brewing area, more to come…

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NYT On Search

Today's Times has a longish piece on search titled "Search Engines Build a Better Mousetrap." The article reviews alternatives to Google. I am quoted in it, but the reporter misheard one key detail: I said "millions" not "billions" in the quote below… John Battelle, who maintains a Web log…

Today’s Times has a longish piece on search titled “Search Engines Build a Better Mousetrap.” The article reviews alternatives to Google.

I am quoted in it, but the reporter misheard one key detail: I said “millions” not “billions” in the quote below…

John Battelle, who maintains a Web log about search technology (Searchblog, at battellemedia.com), said innovations like “Block View” showed how dynamically the search companies were taking advantage of new technologies – and new economies.

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