The Next iPhone Test

I've been watching the overwhelmingly positive "reviews" of the new Verizon iPhone bounce around the blogosphere today, and I have to say, it's hard to not get caught up on the excitement: Hey! I can actually MAKE A PHONE CALL! Well, perhaps we've all forgotten, but until the iPhone hit…

I’ve been watching the overwhelmingly positive “reviews” of the new Verizon iPhone bounce around the blogosphere today, and I have to say, it’s hard to not get caught up on the excitement: Hey! I can actually MAKE A PHONE CALL!

Well, perhaps we’ve all forgotten, but until the iPhone hit AT&T’s network and slammed it to the ground, phone calls were pretty much the same on either network. IE, they both had their issues, depending on where you were in the world. And it’s sort of not fair to compare Verizon’s pre-iPhone network to AT&T’s currently overwhelmed one. Remember, all those reviewers are getting clear reception *now*, before the Verizon iPhone even comes out. Let’s wait and see what happens when there are millions of the data hungry buggers on Verizon’s network. That will be the true test of whether it can continue to be the best carrier for voice.

This piece:  Verizon Wireless to begin throttling data speeds of heaviest users from BGR seems to indicate that Verizon knows it’s in for some serious stress testing, and is preparing for battle.

Author: John Battelle

A founder of NewCo (current CEO), sovrn (Chair), Federated Media, Web 2 Summit, The Industry Standard, Wired. Author, investor, board member (Acxiom, Sovrn, NewCo), bike rider, yoga practitioner.

3 thoughts on “The Next iPhone Test”

  1. The difference now is that Verizon already has millions of Android users, which has been shown in studies to be even bigger data hogs than iPhone users. I don’t think we’ll see much if any difference in the service.

  2. Nope, you are mistaken. AT&T was dropping calls in the Bay area long before the iPhone. AT&T is like AOL, they oversold their network…when it gets maxed out, you get booted.

  3. Massive opportunity for a LinkedIn Groupon clone. The B2B space is sparce right about now… and they have the self-selecting audience that does not rely upon Email.

    Also interested in whether people deem LinkedIn as a possible Facebook replacement, should privacy and/or workplace-related issues prove a drag on working day usage of Facebook.

    In my eyes the revenue potential of LinkedIn outways Facebook. The page value is certainly several magnitudes higher, even with LinkedIns current rev model. -If they play certain cards right and I predict they could all but own the B2B marketplace.

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