Opening Up The Social Graph

You may recall in August I noted that David Recordan was going to Six Apart, and Brad Fitzpatrick was leaving to join Google. They promised to do some cool work on the concept of the social graph, popularized recently by Mark Zuckerberg at Facebook. Today David posted some news…

You may recall in August I noted that David Recordan was going to Six Apart, and Brad Fitzpatrick was leaving to join Google. They promised to do some cool work on the concept of the social graph, popularized recently by Mark Zuckerberg at Facebook. Today David posted some news about work he’s done:

Your lists of friends and connections on the social websites that you use, sometimes called your social graph, belongs to you. No one company should own who you know and how you know them. OpenID, which was born at Six Apart less than two years ago, was successful by embracing a similar philosophy: no one company should own everyone’s online identity. An open social graph is just as important as an open identity.

* You should own your social graph

* Privacy must be done right by placing control in your hands

* It is good to be able to find out what is already public about you on the Internet

* Everyone has many social graphs, and they shouldn’t always be connected

* Open technologies are the best way to solve these problems

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Yar.

No postin'? Yaaaaaaaaar. Twas celebratin' the day, acourse! Honestly, I had a very full day of meetings, with my pals at Six Apart, Cnet, Current, Mark at Facebook, and more. It was good to be on the road chatting with people again. I hope to do more of it….

200Px-Talk Like A Pirate Day

No postin’? Yaaaaaaaaar. Twas celebratin’ the day, acourse!

Honestly, I had a very full day of meetings, with my pals at Six Apart, Cnet, Current, Mark at Facebook, and more. It was good to be on the road chatting with people again. I hope to do more of it.

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Google Does Rich Media Ads (Like the Rest of The World), But With A Few New Twists

(image) It's happened: Google has embraced rich media, and true to the company's history, it's taken what everyone is already doing, and added some cool twists based on innovations across the market. (This move was noted by many, including Niall). But this is not just "ads as widgets." It's…

51Ag7Hrv96L. Aa240 (image)

It’s happened: Google has embraced rich media, and true to the company’s history, it’s taken what everyone is already doing, and added some cool twists based on innovations across the market. (This move was noted by many, including Niall).

But this is not just “ads as widgets.” It’s leveraging the media plan as the message (sorry, McLuhan). At FM, we’ve also created some of these units (our ads driven by RSS feeds, for example, won FM a Webby honor). And it’s certainly true that advertisers like ’em.

I’m particularly pleased with the use of “conversations” in the release, as well as a step toward what I’ve termed “sell side advertising” – the idea of putting your ads out there and letting the publishers/people drive them. It’s not quite there yet, but it’s nice validation nevertheless. Here’re the juicy bits of the release:

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How Google Might Lose In Software: Joel On Software

Read this, it's quite thought provoking. Especially for old journalists like me who actually covered Lotus 1-2-3. And your programmers are like, jeez louise, GMail is huge, we can’t port GMail to this stupid NewSDK. We’d have to change every line of code. Heck it’d be a complete rewrite;…

Read this, it’s quite thought provoking. Especially for old journalists like me who actually covered Lotus 1-2-3.

And your programmers are like, jeez louise, GMail is huge, we can’t port GMail to this stupid NewSDK. We’d have to change every line of code. Heck it’d be a complete rewrite; the whole programming model is upside down and recursive and the portable programming language has more parentheses than even Google can buy. The last line of almost every function consists of a string of 3,296 right parentheses. You have to buy a special editor to count them.

And the NewSDK people ship a pretty decent word processor and a pretty decent email app and a killer Facebook/Twitter event publisher that synchronizes with everything, so people start using it.

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Oh. My. This Is Interesting: Ogilvy Exec Goes to Google

From Ad Age: Andy Berndt, co-president of Ogilvy & Mather's New York office, has left his post at the agency to go to Google, where he will helm a new global unit dedicated to collaborating with marketers, agencies and entertainment companies. ….There has been much speculation over the past…

Think Different-1From Ad Age:

Andy Berndt, co-president of Ogilvy & Mather’s New York office, has left his post at the agency to go to Google, where he will helm a new global unit dedicated to collaborating with marketers, agencies and entertainment companies.

….There has been much speculation over the past year whether Google would try to get into the agency business. The new global unit isn’t being called an agency, but any unit offering creative consultation and account services could be considered one. Interestingly, Google had been trying to lure more creative talent to the company over the past year, according to ad industry executives familiar with the search giant.

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Thinking Out Loud: Rupert Murdoch and Chris DeWolfe

Continuing my series on folks I'll be interviewing at Web 2 this year, next up is Rupert Murdoch and Chris DeWolfe, who will be our dinner guests on the first night. As previously noted (thanks for all your input), we start the day with Mark Zuckerberg, and it has…

MurdochChris Dewolfe

Continuing my series on folks I’ll be interviewing at Web 2 this year, next up is Rupert Murdoch and Chris DeWolfe, who will be our dinner guests on the first night. As previously noted (thanks for all your input), we start the day with Mark Zuckerberg, and it has a certain balance to end day one with Murdoch and DeWolfe, whose MySpace ruled the social networking roost uncontested until Facebook’s rapid acension. Regardless, the purchase of MySpace still ranks as one of the smartest moves ever made by an “old media” company.

Now, MySpace is still much bigger than Facebook, but as many are quick to point out, Facebook is growing much faster (more here). Clearly one topic of conversation will be how MySpace will respond to its new competitor – will it open up to the extent Facebook has, for example? It’s already well down the path of making money – in fact, it recently introduced a new self service ad platform based on six months of research into leveraging personal profile information.

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Google – Doubleclick – Are We Worried Yet?

(emdot photo credit) The Google-Doubleclick merger is not yet complete. While it seems likely that the merger will go through, it's not a layup – the FTC in late May took the process to "second request" phase. And not surprisingly, in response Google has been quite active lately with…

Fog

(emdot photo credit) The Google-Doubleclick merger is not yet complete. While it seems likely that the merger will go through, it’s not a layup – the FTC in late May took the process to “second request” phase. And not surprisingly, in response Google has been quite active lately with regards to the policy issues that frame the FTC’s decision (more on the process in my coverage here).

The most recent sign? A post on Google’s public policy blog, pointing to Google’s public comments on the FTC’s Town Hall meeting on the subject of online advertising, to be held in early November.

The big elephant in the room? Privacy. And, FOG. (Fear of Google). From Google’s post:

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You Remember IBM, Don’t You?

Smackdown time, Google. IBM is joining the free online office suite market place with Symphony (InfoWorld), a very old Lotus office suite that has been updated and integrated with the Sun-sponsored OpenOffice suite, which released a new version today. The press is playing this as a bid to compete…

Openoffice

Ibm Logo-1

Smackdown time, Google. IBM is joining the free online office suite market place with Symphony (InfoWorld), a very old Lotus office suite that has been updated and integrated with the Sun-sponsored OpenOffice suite, which released a new version today. The press is playing this as a bid to compete with Microsoft, since IBM and Microsoft were once bitter rivals, but honestly, it’s more fun to consider an IBM/Google smackdown.

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The New York Times Joins the Point To Economy

One of my favorite pieces of Thinking Out Loud for the last book was "From Pull to Point", in which I chided the Economist, the Journal, and others on their subscription online business models, which totally ignored the value of what I call the "Point To Economy". I would…

Nyt-1

One of my favorite pieces of Thinking Out Loud for the last book was “From Pull to Point“, in which I chided the Economist, the Journal, and others on their subscription online business models, which totally ignored the value of what I call the “Point To Economy”. I would have chided the New York Times Select as well, but it was free back then. Then the Op Ed columnists went behind a pay wall, and I had reservations, but said I’d subscribe and check it out. Turns out, I didn’t, and it seems not enough others did as well. Yesterday the pay wall came down, and not just for Op Ed, but for the entire archive as well.

This is a huge move to the hoop, and I think it’s the right one. I love the archives, and now they will be getting all the search juice they richly deserve. Here’s the reasoning, from a Times article covering the move:

What changed, The Times said, was that many more readers started coming to the site from search engines and links on other sites instead of coming directly to NYTimes.com. These indirect readers, unable to get access to articles behind the pay wall and less likely to pay subscription fees than the more loyal direct users, were seen as opportunities for more page views and increased advertising revenue.



Way to go, NYT!

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Google’s Presentation App Ready

Eric announced this when I interviewed him on stage at the Web 2 Expo in April, the app is now live as part of a refreshed Google Docs….

Eric announced this when I interviewed him on stage at the Web 2 Expo in April, the app is now live as part of a refreshed Google Docs.

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