Google Blog Search Tops Technorati

Hitwise research reports that Google Blog Search passed Technorati in traffic for the first time last week. As a percentage of total US Internet Visit market share, Technorati moved to .0023%, and Google's Blog Search to .0025%. Google Blog Search has experienced massive growth since October, when a direct…

Hitwise research reports that Google Blog Search passed Technorati in traffic for the first time last week. As a percentage of total US Internet Visit market share, Technorati moved to .0023%, and Google’s Blog Search to .0025%.

Google Blog Search has experienced massive growth since October, when a direct link to it was placed on Google News— to the detriment even of Blogger Blog Search, which slid from .0025% in October to .0019% last week.

Author: John Battelle

A founder of NewCo (current CEO), sovrn (Chair), Federated Media, Web 2 Summit, The Industry Standard, Wired. Author, investor, board member (Acxiom, Sovrn, NewCo), bike rider, yoga practitioner.

8 thoughts on “Google Blog Search Tops Technorati”

  1. Search is useful to separate people, everywhere the news. Everywhere rubbish. Everywhere Google, everywhere China, everywhere words without power. Everywhere Technocrats.
    Google , Yahoo is nothing more than isolation. More isolation.

  2. I do not agree that Google is nothing more than isolation.
    i do understand and respect the feelings that other people have for Google.But i also appreciate the fact that it is Google that has given the online industry a better direction and a organized way to things.It has a major contribution in setting good online standards which were not in existence at all.
    The amount of business that every individual generates from Google and other search engines is unbelievable.
    Google has again proved itself and it support staff for out beating Technorati in terms of hits.Nothing seems to be impossible for Google.
    This also seems to be a a warning to several others where Google may run over.

  3. Both of those engines are woefully short of providing any idea of just how good their coverage is, what their refresh rates are, and how to measure they’re consistent performance. Has anyone ever really tested them?

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