Gillmor, Media, Blogging

As nearly everyone knows, Dan Gillmor has moved to the entrepreneurial world, and I'm tickled he's out here in the wild now, figuring out his next thing and just hanging it out and seeing what might come. Today there's news that he has been appointed a fellow at Stanford…

GillmorAs nearly everyone knows, Dan Gillmor has moved to the entrepreneurial world, and I’m tickled he’s out here in the wild now, figuring out his next thing and just hanging it out and seeing what might come. Today there’s news that he has been appointed a fellow at Stanford Law’s Center for Internet & Society, and is organizing a conference on the idea of the citizen journalist. At the end of the day, I sense that the citizen journalist equates with my fundamental definition of a journalist, regardless of credentials: a person who both has the talent and the desire to report, investigate, question, and care about something that others in a community also care about. As an industry and over time, we may have forgotten this fundamental truth, but I see it every time I teach at Berkeley – students with an itch to communicate what they see, regardless of the outcome. Given the fall of icons such as CBS and the NYT, it’s a good thing that we can still honor such an impulse in our culture, and I look forward to seeing what Dan will do next.

Author: John Battelle

A founder of NewCo (current CEO), sovrn (Chair), Federated Media, Web 2 Summit, The Industry Standard, Wired. Author, investor, board member (Acxiom, Sovrn, NewCo), bike rider, yoga practitioner.

One thought on “Gillmor, Media, Blogging”

  1. Y’know, as an ex-journalist and amateur(ish) blogger, I’m uncomfortable with this notion that anyone with a $4.95 Typepad account and a pair of eyes can stand on the same level as Harrison Salisbury or Seymour Hersh. A couple of things missing from your skillset list for the citizen-journalist: an ability to write well, and some knowledge of libel law. The latter is particularly relevant to your phrase “…regardless of the outcome.” Sometimes an outcome can be quite harmful to an innocent, non-public individual.

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