Mining the Web for Marketing Intelligence

I had a good conversation with the CEO of Intelliseek today. His company specializes in mining business intelligence from the roar of commentary and speculation in blogs, usenet, and various other opinion sites. The company also can probe internal user behavior (ie mine data on how users use a particular…

I had a good conversation with the CEO of Intelliseek today. His company specializes in mining business intelligence from the roar of commentary and speculation in blogs, usenet, and various other opinion sites. The company also can probe internal user behavior (ie mine data on how users use a particular site) to gain analytical insights. The upshot: a much higher velocity feedback loop between producers and consumers. Examples: Consumer feedback on movie trailers, new cars, mutual funds, etc. can quickly be rolled into revisions, new features, or competitive advantage. All this from intelligently searching through public webspace. I came away impressed. Watch this company.

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More on Sprinks: It’s the distribution

I've been thinking a bit more about the Sprinks deal, mainly through the lens of what's happening to Google's world. It's simple, but true: When Yahoo switches over to its own internal search technology (which will happen soon – probably in the next two or three quarters), Google will lose…

I’ve been thinking a bit more about the Sprinks deal, mainly through the lens of what’s happening to Google’s world. It’s simple, but true: When Yahoo switches over to its own internal search technology (which will happen soon – probably in the next two or three quarters), Google will lose a shitload of distribution. Seen in this light, it only makes sense to buy more through About.com, which is the fourth or fifth largest content site on the Web. If the IPO timing rumours are true, it would make no sense for Google to go public, then get clobbered when the other Yahoo shoe drops. Hence, the Sprinks deal is less about Sprinks, and far more about getting About.com’s distribution. The original press release and other coverage shows this was all about higher margins for Primedia, and gaining distribution for Google. Google’s own AdSense/AdWords will be used across the About/Primedia properties, not Sprinks. Sprinks itself will probably be kept on life support for a while, then killed/replaced with Google products. In this DirectNews article covering the deal, Kevin Lee put it well: “I don’t see it as a technology play. They made a case to Primedia that the cash flow would be higher with them than their own internal property.” Primedia, which is under significant debt burden and must focus on its core magazine business, is driven by a need to simplify its business and add to its margins. Google needs distribution to cover its anticipated losses from Yahoo’s future moves. Voila, a perfect union.

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Sprinks Sold

Not surprising, and in the works for sometime, Primedia sold Sprinks to Google Thursday of last week. My posting software was wacky for a few days, so I'm posting this late, I'll have more on this if I talk to the parties involved, probably later this week. Side note: This…

Not surprising, and in the works for sometime, Primedia sold Sprinks to Google Thursday of last week. My posting software was wacky for a few days, so I’m posting this late, I’ll have more on this if I talk to the parties involved, probably later this week. Side note: This past week, Kelly Conlin, my old boss at IDG, took over at Primedia. Saw him in NY, and he looks happy. It was good to reconnect.

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The WSJ Gets Hip to Search

The Google IPO story last week got the Journal's attention (as this sub-required article shows) and a later follow on by the "Real Time" online column does a decent job of bringing folks up to speed. The main point that is worth watching – the Journal now understands that Amazon,…

The Google IPO story last week got the Journal’s attention (as this sub-required article shows) and a later follow on by the “Real Time” online column does a decent job of bringing folks up to speed. The main point that is worth watching – the Journal now understands that Amazon, EBay, and Interactive Corp. are all search driven businesses. That marks progress for the “Search is the new interface for the Net” meme.

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Wolf on Amazon

Yesterday I meant to note Gary's latest piece of wonderful writing, The Great Library of Amazonia. It's in the upcoming issue of Wired, and it relates a key insight that authors really grok (thanks Steven Johnson) – in the age of Google, books are increasingly valuable as resources for contextualized…

Yesterday I meant to note Gary’s latest piece of wonderful writing, The Great Library of Amazonia. It’s in the upcoming issue of Wired, and it relates a key insight that authors really grok (thanks Steven Johnson) – in the age of Google, books are increasingly valuable as resources for contextualized knowledge. Books are highly processed, extremely linked texts, but their power has been largely absent from mainstream search engines. Chalk one up for Amazon Book Search, which was first to bring this power to search. I imagine it’s driving folks at Google and Yahoo nuts.

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