Jakob Nielsen, Holiday Mixer

If you've ever driven down I-880 coming from points North toward San Jose, noticed the line of homes etched into the Eastern hills above Fremont, and wondered – "Who lives up there?" – the answer is Jakob Nielsen. Nielsen is a reknown user interface expert who's written numerous books and…

If you’ve ever driven down I-880 coming from points North toward San Jose, noticed the line of homes etched into the Eastern hills above Fremont, and wondered – “Who lives up there?” – the answer is Jakob Nielsen. Nielsen is a reknown user interface expert who’s written numerous books and articles on web design, and who was an early Google advisory board member. I drove up to see him yesterday on my way down to the Google holiday party (well, the Google holiday party for members of the press, anyway). Jakob’s house affords a sweeping view of the bay area from a more southern perspective, which is a bit disconcerting for someone who is used to seeing the bay from Mt. Tam or UC Berkeley.
Jakob has plenty to say about the state of search and design on the web. When I asked what was next in search, he said “Solving your problem, as opposed to finding you the best site.” An interesting insight. He believes search is a critical thinking skill that should be taught in the elementary school system, and I agree. It’s amazing how much smarter you can be online if you know a few basic search skills – use of quotes, and/or operators, a few basic syntax elements.
After Jakob I drove across the Valley to Google’s new building, this time for a holiday media mixer. Just about everyone who’s ever covered Google was there, from Dan Gillmor (SJMerc) to Fred Vogelstein (Fortune) to Kara Swisher (WSJ) to Stephanie Olsen (Cnet). And senior Google folks turned out in force, though some were obviously uncomfortable with being in a room teeming with journalists. I saw about ten folks I have interviewed for the book, it was good to reconnect. All in all a nice affair, and I had some interesting conversations with Craig Silverstein (employee #1), Krishna Bharat (created Google News and is now going to India to help start that project), Shona Brown (new at Google, running biz operations, wrote a good book back in the early bubble that may as well be a blueprint for Google right now), and many others. Larry, Sergey and Eric were there as well, they were predictably mobbed. I said hello and moved on. I hear Cory was in the house, though I didn’t see him, but Joi Ito was there, looking younger than when I first met him at Wired in 1993. How the hell did he do that?

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Google, India, Yahoo, Paul

I spent most of yesterday working on the book, talking to folks at Yahoo, Google, and with Paul Saffo. I met with Terry Winnograd, who was Larry Page's professor at Stanford, worked with Larry and Sergey early in the project, and is still on Google's technical advisory board (scroll down)….

I spent most of yesterday working on the book, talking to folks at Yahoo, Google, and with Paul Saffo. I met with Terry Winnograd, who was Larry Page’s professor at Stanford, worked with Larry and Sergey early in the project, and is still on Google’s technical advisory board (scroll down). While I was there I ran into Yossi Vardi, who is always a joy to see. The man is always beaming, and this was no exception, he was touring Google’s new building with Sergey and telling enthusiastic stories about Sergey’s recent trip to Israel (Yossi of course played host). In any case, internationalization is clearly a theme at Google. The company recently announced a new R&D center in India. I asked David Krane (Director of CC) why, and he said he company can’t expect everyone to come here, and there’s a lot of talent in Bangalore. Makes sense.

Terry is an energetic man, he was a founding member of CPSR and has done a lot of work on natural language and HCI (human computer interface). He recently took a sebbatical from Stanford to work at Google full time, and is now moving back into the academic life. I won’t go into all we discussed (gotta save something for the book!) but it was a good meeting, and I heard some funny tales of the early days, among other things.

At Yahoo I met with Srinija Srinivasan, Yahoo’s Editor in Chief. She’s been there almost since the beginning, and we had a robust and lengthy conversation about the role of editorial in search, the role of the directory at Yahoo (very interesting) and challenges ahead for the industry and the company. I really enjoyed Ninj, as she is known. She’s only 32, but has spent nearly 9 years thinking about this stuff as EIC at Yahoo. Prior to that, she worked on Doug Lenat’s CYC project, which for those of you unfamiliar with it was a very brave, arguably foolish, and ultimately unsuccessful attempt to solve AI’s “brittleness” problem. CYCorp still exists, applying some of its early work to corporate data issues.

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The Database of Intentions

So nothing really new in the news today, I wanted to take a graf or two and explain what I mean by The Database of Intentions, referred to in this post. That way I can use it again and again and just link the phrase to this post. Hey, we…

So nothing really new in the news today, I wanted to take a graf or two and explain what I mean by The Database of Intentions, referred to in this post. That way I can use it again and again and just link the phrase to this post. Hey, we love the web, Ted Nelson lives….

The Database of Intentions is an idea central to the book I’ve been working on for the past year or so, which is tentatively titled “The Search: Business and Culture in the Age of Google” (Penguin/Putnam/Portfolio 2004). As with many in this industry, it all started with the Macintosh. Back in the mid 80s I was an undergraduate in Cultural Antropology, and I had a class – taught by the late Jim Deetz,which focused on the idea of material culture – basically, interpreting the artifacts of everyday life. It took the tools of archaeology – usually taught only in the context of civilizations long dead – and merged them with the tools of Cultural Anthropology, which interpreted living cultures. He encouraged us to see all things modified by man as expressions of culture, and therefore as keys to understanding culture itself. I began to see language, writing, and most everyday things in a new light – as reflecting the culture which created them, and fraught with all kinds of intent, contreversies, politics, relationships. It was a way to pick up current culture and hold it in your hand, make sense of it, read it.
(more via link below)

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