free html hit counter Google Changes AdSense Pricing Strategy | John Battelle's Search Blog

Google Changes AdSense Pricing Strategy

By - April 02, 2004

googleAdSense is Google’s contextual ad product for publishers – the one folks can sign up for and have up and running on their own site in minutes. Google’s advertisers have long complained that AdSense ads are far less valuable to them than AdWords ads (the ones that run on Google’s site), as folks who are reading content on any given site have far less intent to buy than folks who are actively searching for something on Google’s site. Google steadfastly mixed the two and would not offer variable pricing, until now. But their plan is not to split the purchase, but rather “monitor performance” and offer a better rate if conversions are low. Cnet reports. Overture already offers a split pricing service.

This move is widely seen as “Google giving in to advertiser demands.” Interesting. Jarvis sees it another way: He says publishers – in particular bloggers – are getting shafted by an ever more powerful Google. He’s hoping to drive interest in alternatives via his session at Bloggercon.


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4 thoughts on “Google Changes AdSense Pricing Strategy

  1. Arthur Wouk says:

    There is a tremendous amount of fraud on those AdSense sites. And just bad traffic. As an advertiser, I have opted out of “content match” and having my ads show up on AdSense sites.

  2. In the television you pay for the number of persons who see the program, but not all of them are potential clients. I believe that every advertiser must select the pages in which is profitable to include his announcements.

  3. Jon Gales says:

    My ads on MobileTracker.net CarbWire.com are making more money after the change (had to give it a few days to get an average). This helps the AdSense program by rewarding good content, and slowing down spammer type sites.

  4. It will be interesting to see how AdSense changes over time in relation to potential spamming of the system, which could actually bring it down.