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5 thoughts on “I Was Wondering … Matt Answers

  1. nmw says:

    Very slick response! 8D

    Here’s my reply to Matt’s point of view:

    The way I understand what you’re saying, is that when we use the browser, Google no longer cares so much about which links we click on. Instead, Google wants to know which terms we type into the URL bar (the “Wisdom of the Language” — see http://gaggle.info/miscellaneous/articles/wisdom-of-the-language :). Also, Google wants to know which language we think we’re speaking.

    BTW: how is knowing a URL hash different from knowing the URL itself?

    Love the corporate-speak coming out of Google these days. I guess Steve would say: “Some day, Sergey!” ;D

  2. nmw says:

    Matt has responded: I believe the reason for the name is the idea of “browser chrome”, the stuff that goes around the outside of the window. So the irony is that Chrome doesn’t have much actual chrome itself.

    (note that he hasn’t responded to my question yet, though there is a strong echo of comments repeating basically the same question)

    I guess what Matt means WRT “chrome” is that Google doesn’t plan on making money from the way the application works — so perhaps they have another motive for bringing this out? Would Google shareholders support the idea that Google should build applications, offer support, etc. — in other words: incurring exorbitant costs with no revenue model whatsoever? What is the business model behind the jovial irony going by the name “Chrome”?

  3. nmw says:

    re: Google’s Hash Engine

    What happens to the functionality of this chrome browser if/when I am not able to establish a connection to google.com?

    Will the chrome browser ONLY work if the chrome user’s computer is transferring data from/to Google.COM?

    Does the chrome hash create a “hash dependency” of the chrome user on Google.COM?

    Are there other ways that the chrome browser requires the chrome user to download data from Google.COM, or to upload data to Google.COM?

    Note that such dependency of software on online information services is nothing new — perhaps one of the most prominent examples of this is Apple’s ITunes service.

  4. mrg says:

    AND i was wondering: was there any correlation to the launch date of Chrome and a USPTO granting a browser patent to GOOG the same day?

    http://patft1.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?patentnumber=7,421,432

    It may be harmless, but then again, the comic book and koolaid flowing from the campus make Chrome sound like a fully open source (and ostensibly by association) and more innocent product.

    But in reality it’s a service.

    …worth looking in to.

  5. FORUM says:

    I guess what Matt means WRT “chrome” is that Google doesn’t plan on making money from the way the application works — so perhaps they have another motive for bringing this out? Would Google shareholders support the idea that Google should build applications, offer support, etc. — in other words: incurring exorbitant costs with no revenue model whatsoever? What is the business model behind the jovial irony going by the name “Chrome”?