Super Fresh

Steven Johnson has written for Time what I wish I had the time to write: Skeptics might wonder just how much subversion and wit is conveyable via 140-character updates. But in recent months Twitter users have begun to find a route around that limitation by employing Twitter as a pointing…

Steven Johnson has written for Time what I wish I had the time to write:

Skeptics might wonder just how much subversion and wit is conveyable via 140-character updates. But in recent months Twitter users have begun to find a route around that limitation by employing Twitter as a pointing device instead of a communications channel: sharing links to longer articles, discussions, posts, videos — anything that lives behind a URL. Websites that once saw their traffic dominated by Google search queries are seeing a growing number of new visitors coming from “passed links” at social networks like Twitter and Facebook. This is what the naysayers fail to understand: it’s just as easy to use Twitter to spread the word about a brilliant 10,000-word New Yorker article as it is to spread the word about your Lucky Charms habit.

Put those three elements together — social networks, live searching and link-sharing — and you have a cocktail that poses what may amount to the most interesting alternative to Google’s near monopoly in searching. At its heart, Google’s system is built around the slow, anonymous accumulation of authority: pages rise to the top of Google’s search results according to, in part, how many links point to them, which tends to favor older pages that have had time to build an audience. That’s a fantastic solution for finding high-quality needles in the immense, spam-plagued haystack that is the contemporary Web. But it’s not a particularly useful solution for finding out what people are saying right now, the in-the-moment conversation that industry pioneer John Battelle calls the “super fresh” Web.

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“Better off if we’d never heard the word Microsoft”

That's Carol Bartz, Yahoo CEO, who I swear I heard say the opposite (read about 2/3rds down) just a week ago at the D Conference. Perhaps she's finally putting the ghost of failed negotiations behind her, or, perhaps she's just furthering them. What do you all think?…

That’s Carol Bartz, Yahoo CEO, who I swear I heard say the opposite (read about 2/3rds down) just a week ago at the D Conference. Perhaps she’s finally putting the ghost of failed negotiations behind her, or, perhaps she’s just furthering them. What do you all think?

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Liveblogging the Microsoft Search News

While the company still is mum on what it's announcing today at the D Conference (update it's now official….), everyone at the event presumes Steve Ballmer will be debuting Microsoft's new take on search, widely rumored to be called Bing. I am not certain there will be wifi coverage in…

Bing_c_CMYK_rev.pngWhile the company still is mum on what it’s announcing today at the D Conference (update it’s now official….), everyone at the event presumes Steve Ballmer will be debuting Microsoft’s new take on search, widely rumored to be called Bing. I am not certain there will be wifi coverage in the main ballroom, but it there is, I will be liveblogging his talk starting at 8.30 am PST. If there is not, look for my updates via SMS on Twitter.

Some of my notes:

Steve is being very Steve – emphatic, in selling mode, drinking a massive Starbucks iced coffee. Discussing why Bing, why now he says Microsoft decided search needed a new brand, but: “Building a brand is a step, step, STEP (almost yelling)!” Bing is a brand that consumers can get their mind around. We have to grow significantly relatively to where we are. We have to build brand equity as well as technology equity.

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Bing

On my way to the D conference today, one of the main events is alleged to be the launch of "Bing," Microsoft's new search engine. I've been playing with it a bit, more on that later. Meanwhile, Microsoft plans a big marketing push, here's the news in Ad Age: People…

On my way to the D conference today, one of the main events is alleged to be the launch of “Bing,” Microsoft’s new search engine. I’ve been playing with it a bit, more on that later. Meanwhile, Microsoft plans a big marketing push, here’s the news in Ad Age:

People with knowledge of the planned push said the ads won’t go after Google, or Yahoo for that matter, by name. Instead, they’ll focus on planting the idea that today’s search engines don’t work as well as consumers previously thought by asking them whether search (aka Google) really solves their problems. That, Microsoft is hoping, will give consumers a reason to consider switching search engines, which, of course, is one of Bing’s biggest challenges.

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Twitter’s Continued Inflection: Time For Facebook Connect

TC notes the extraordinary growth Twitter has seen since its initial inflection. This is a growth pattern I have never seen in terms of speed – not in the nearly 25 years I've been watching this industry. I think this is both Twitter's most important and dangerous phase of its…

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TC notes the extraordinary growth Twitter has seen since its initial inflection. This is a growth pattern I have never seen in terms of speed – not in the nearly 25 years I’ve been watching this industry.

I think this is both Twitter’s most important and dangerous phase of its young life. The retention problem must be addressed, and quickly. In my previous post about Twitter adding value to new users, I suggested Twitter incorporate some structure around its suggested users feature.

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Real Time Search and Google: An Admission

Recall my piece on "from static to real time search," and read this coverage of Eric and Larry's take on Twitter: Larry Page, Google’s co-founder, separately admitted Google needs to learn from Twitter and make its search engine operate at real-time speed. Speaking at the Zeitgeist event during in a…

Recall my piece on “from static to real time search,” and read this coverage of Eric and Larry’s take on Twitter:

Larry Page, Google’s co-founder, separately admitted Google needs to learn from Twitter and make its search engine operate at real-time speed.

Speaking at the Zeitgeist event during in a “fireside chat”, hosted by Mr Schmidt, Mr Page admitted Google had so far “done a relatively poor job of creating things that work on a per second basis”.

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As We Head Toward A More Conversational Interface, Can AdWords Keep Up?

Gian Fulgoni, Executive Chair of Comscore, has an interesting analysis of what's happening in paid search lately. It's germane to my earlier posts about paid search share sliding and Google's decision to allow trademark ad bidding. In his post, Gian notes that overall search queries are up dramatically (68% over…

Gian Fulgoni, Executive Chair of Comscore, has an interesting analysis of what’s happening in paid search lately. It’s germane to my earlier posts about paid search share sliding and Google’s decision to allow trademark ad bidding.

In his post, Gian notes that overall search queries are up dramatically (68% over two years) but:

if one looks at the number of paid clicks, the growth rate is a lower 18%, which raises the question: why have paid clicks grown 3x slower than the total number of queries?

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Google Makes Changes to Trademark Policy, Revenues Will Be Up…

…and so will legal challenges, many of which are already underway. Google's blog post is here. Details: Google will now allow advertisers to bid on trademark terms, even if they don't own the trademark, so, for example, a local hardware store can bid on "Buy Makita Saws here" or Best…

…and so will legal challenges, many of which are already underway.

Google’s blog post is here.

Details: Google will now allow advertisers to bid on trademark terms, even if they don’t own the trademark, so, for example, a local hardware store can bid on “Buy Makita Saws here” or Best Buy could bid on “Best Prices for Sony Plasmas”.

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