Net Neutrality loses vote

Yesterday, a Senate committee voted out the net neutrality amendment by a narrow tie missing the needed majority (11-11), while approving the larger bill. The protective amendment could reenter before the broad telecom bill arises for a floor vote, though it's not clear when that will happen. Despite the…

Yesterday, a Senate committee voted out the net neutrality amendment by a narrow tie missing the needed majority (11-11), while approving the larger bill. The protective amendment could reenter before the broad telecom bill arises for a floor vote, though it’s not clear when that will happen. Despite the loss, the close vote is leading many neutrality activists to hope that the Republican opposition will face a challenge in the full Senate vote.

(via Melanie)

3 thoughts on “Net Neutrality loses vote”

  1. This really irks me… Dont people realize that each of these small chunks out of the already swiss cheese of internet neutrality and freedom of speech online undermine its power and capabilities for all future users (like our kids!)

  2. Really…the less government involvement we have in the Internet the better. Doesn’t neutrality mean the government won’t side with the public, telco’s or media companies? That’s fairness and free markets at its best.

  3. If that bill passes, people can kiss innovation good-bye. Anyone who remembers what happened to low-band television applications will understand what I’m referring to when I say the complaint provision in this bill will effectively provide anyone with the means of impairing all new development.

    So, anyone who already has laid the groundwork for new infrastructure will be protected from the complaint provision, but anyone who has not yet built their foundation will be subjected to the same administrative blocks that prevented thousands of community organizations and groups from creating their own mini-television stations in the 1970s.

    All this bill does is ensure that the large bandwidth users don’t have to directly pay for the cost of developing a highspeed conduit only they would use anyway.

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