free html hit counter March 2016 - John Battelle's Search Blog

New Posts…For All You RSS Readers

By - March 23, 2016

I’ve been writing a lot at NewCo’s publication, and will continue to do so. But I want to make sure you folks know about that work, so here are links to a couple of  new pieces.

And The Award for the Best Marketing Execution At SXSW Goes To …

I went to SXSW again this year, and IBM really nailed their million-dollar activation.

Because Calling It “Profiting From The Financialization of Death” Won’t Make the Phones Ring

Pretty joints after midnight stuff, but man, I’m reading Rana’s new book and this one made my head spin.

Lastly, if you want to stay current on my work at NewCo, which is increasingly editorial in nature, sign up for the Daily newsletter. We’re also launching a Weekly version, for which I’ll be writing a regular column. Sign up here!

  • Content Marquee

Metaservices FTW!

By - March 07, 2016

Chiclets

Way back when — well, a few years back anyway— I wrote a series of posts around the idea of “metaservices.” As I mused, I engaged in a bit of derision around the current state (at that point) of the mobile ecosystem, calling it “chiclet-ized” — silos of useful data without a true Internet between them. You know, like individually wrapped cubes of shiny, colored gum that you had to chew one at a time.

I suggested that we needed a connective layer between all those chiclets, letting information flow between all those amazing services.

It’s happening. First, with deep linking, which has successfully integrated the apps, the mobile OS via notification layer, email, and the broader mobile and desktop web. And now with an emerging, multi-tasking layer of user command and control based on the simplest of interfaces: Text.

Check out Prompt, which TechCrunch aptly called “a command line for the real world.” Prompt is about two things. First, integrations with useful mobile services — the chiclets. And second, a simple, social, text-like interface that allows us to get shit done. Text Uber, get a car. Text Nest, turn your thermostat down. Text Google, get a search result. Text Facebook, post a status update. Text any smart service, get shit done.

Bots are at the center of this interface — simple, rules-based bots that take our commands, execute them, and tell us of the result. It’s not rocket science, and that’s kind of the point.

It’s great. It’s right. It’s going to work — but only if we remember the other side of the coin. Links should go both ways, after all. If Prompt and others like it want to win, they have to become a clearing house for both data going out — our commands — as well as data coming in. It’s one thing to tell our bots and services what to do. It’s another to allow them to talk to each other, and to instrument a platform that gives us control of how they might combine. Once we light that candle, the Internet will shift to another level entirely.

On Tech Leadership

By -

I’ve written a piece over on NewCo that I wanted to also post it here. See below…

If your business focus is in technology or the Internet, as mine has been for nearly three decades, it’s quite possible you’ve never heard of the GLOBE Series, a global conference dedicated to sustainability in business. Until I was invited to participate this year, due in large part to NewCo’s core mission, I certainly hadn’t. What I saw opened my eyes and left me pondering the role of tech in the future of our planet.

The longest-running event dedicated to global environment and business, GLOBE draws more than 9,000 delegates to Vancouver from more than 50 countries around the world. There’s no shortage of government ministers, nonprofit leaders, and sustainability officers from huge companies like Nestlé, Lowe’s, and Citi. But if you peruse the speaker and sponsor lists, it’d be fair to conclude that sustainability simply isn’t a core issue for technology companies. They’re pretty much no-shows.

You’d be wrong, of course  – Google, for example, is the largest purchaser of renewable energy on the planet, and has been carbon neutral for nearly a decade. So why aren’t Larry Page or Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg keynoting GLOBE?

Events like GLOBE, which according to its organizers is growing so fast they plan to double the number of conferences starting next year, are a natural outgrowth of our business ecosystem’s need to address complex social issues like resource stewardship and climate change. If you’re Nestlé, for example, you need a platform to engage with all constituents in core markets (Nestlé is the world’s largest producer of bottled water). But if you’re Google or Facebook? Your products are digital and ephemeral in nature ;  your environmental impact is negligible in comparison to other industries. Facebookcompares the impact of its average user’s carbon footprint to that of “three bananas.”

Multiply that by billions, however, and you realize it takes a lot of bananas to spin all those servers (the Internet consumes the energy of a major nation-state). You wouldn’t know it from wandering the halls at GLOBE, but the biggest tech companies arecommitted leaders in green energy and have a strong story to tell. These same companies also leading the way in doing well by doing good. It’s built into the mission-driven ethos of nearly all leading tech companies.

Even if sometimes those young companies’ efforts seem self-serving or tone-deaf, their fresh, purpose-driven approach to business should inform our most urgent social issue: how we retool our economic engines toward sustainability. It’s not enough that Google is carbon-neutral, or that Amazon has committed to using 100% renewable energy. It’s time for our tech leaders to take the global stage and start to engage with the rest of the business world. The world needs their vision and their influence – before it’s too late.

Want to follow the biggest story in business? Get our NewCo Daily newsletter.