free html hit counter Friday Updates | John Battelle's Search Blog

Friday Updates

By - June 22, 2007

Microsoft alters its approach to desktop search in Vista, but Google says it’s not enough. (WaPo, Ars)

Blinkx tries a video Adsense. (b2)

More steps in the development of a cultural grammar for video. (ars)

Business.com in play? My sources say it’s just rumors, but those tend to push into reality.

Matt has a deep take on Powerset.

Robert likes ClipBlast

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  • JG

    Microsoft alters its approach to desktop search in Vista, but Google says it’s not enough.

    And I’d really like to build my own search engine, based on Google’s platform, so that I have more freedom and choice about the order in which I peruse the SERPs. So when is Google going to relinquish their monopoly on result ordering of their internal indices, and allow 3rd parties to build their own ranking apps?

    I’m not talking about Greasemonkying or SOAPing on top of the current Google SERP presentation. I’m not talking about lightweight domain filtering query operators, to restrict my searches only to a certain set of domains. I am talking about native access to the low level APIs (indices and statistics) so that a third party developer can build their own ranking algorithm.

    This is essentially what Google is asking of Microsoft, right? So what happens when the shoe is on the other foot?

  • GT Staff

    This is just my opinion on this, and I don’t agree on the argument of the previous commenter. First, Google doesn’t have a monopoly on search engine market, so it’s not required to “open up” their platform in that way. All the internet search engines are deployed on a neutral (well, as neutral as it can possibly be, but that’s another issue) platform, that is the internet. You want to make your own third party search engine? Then go build your own. I don’t know if I’m alone with this opinion, but Is google supposed to be required to “open up” in the manner that the previous post is saying, even if for conversation’s sake they reach a monopoly status? After all, going to Google.com is as easy as going to Yahoo.com or (soon, Powerset.com). In the search engine domain per se (google web apps is another topic), there is no barrier that prohibits users from changing their preferred search engine.. Again, just my two cents.